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The following code gives me this error and I am confused. Sorry If I am asking questions wrong, I'm new here but I think this corresponds to the guidelines. The image will move across the background as soon as I release the key it gives me this error and crashes.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\Samga_000\Desktop\game\game.py", line 89, in <module>
    rungame()
  File "C:\Users\Samga_000\Desktop\game\game.py", line 79, in rungame
    p.still()
TypeError: 'int' object is not callable

import pygame, sys
from pygame.locals import *
pygame.init()

WIDTH = 400
HEIGHT = 400
screen = pygame.display.set_mode((WIDTH, HEIGHT))
bif = "grass.png"
background = pygame.image.load(bif)
pygame.display.set_caption('RPG')

def drawEntitys():
    frispri.update()
    frispri.draw(screen)

def drawScreen():
    screen.blit(background, (0,0))


class Player(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    image = pygame.image.load("misha.png")
    image = image.convert_alpha()

    def __init__(self):
        pygame.sprite.Sprite.__init__(self, self.groups)
        self.pos = (20, 20)
        self.image = Player.image
        self.rect = self.image.get_rect()
        self.movepos = [0,0]
        self.area = screen.get_rect()
        self.still = True

    def update(self):
        newpos = self.rect.move(self.movepos)
        if self.area.contains(newpos):
            self.rect = newpos
        pygame.event.pump()

    def move(self, x, y):
        self.still = 0
        if self.still == 0:
            self.movepos[0] = self.movepos[0] - x
            self.movepos[1] = self.movepos[1] - y
        else:
            pass

    def still(self):
        self.still = 1





frispri = pygame.sprite.Group()
Player.groups = frispri
p = Player()


def rungame():
    while True:
        drawScreen()
        drawEntitys()
        for event in pygame.event.get():
            if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
                pygame.quit()
            elif event.type == KEYDOWN:
                if event.key == K_UP:
                    p.move(0,1)
                elif event.key == K_DOWN:
                    p.move(0,-1)
                elif event.key == K_LEFT:
                    p.move(1,0)
                elif event.key == K_RIGHT:
                    p.move(-1,0)
            elif event.type == KEYUP:
                if event.key == K_UP:
                    p.still()
                elif event.key == K_DOWN:
                    p.still()
                elif event.key == K_LEFT:
                    p.still()
                elif event.key == K_RIGHT:
                    p.still()

        flipgame()

def flipgame():
    pygame.display.flip()
rungame()
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On a separate note the if-else block in move is redundant. You are setting self.still = 0 right above the the if self.still == 0 line so the if will always be true. –  Chris Palmer Aug 22 '13 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

Player.still is a boolean, assigned here:

class Player(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self):
        # ...
        self.still = True

You can't call a boolean, since it isn't a function, as you attempt here:

p = Player()
# ...

            p.still()
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I changed "self.still = True" to "self.still = 1" and now it gives me "TypeError: 'int' object is not callable" –  user2708079 Aug 22 '13 at 16:37
    
That's what you claimed the error was in the first place, and 1 still isn't a function! –  Useless Aug 22 '13 at 17:45

This is essentially the same problem as discussed in this question

Your problem is that you have an instance variable, still, with the same name as your method. When you do p.still(), Python interprets the p.still as trying to access the variable not the method, and then trying to 'call' that variable.

The solution is to rename the method or the variable. To get your code to work you should only need to change one of the two. But good programming practice might say you should change both.

Since the variable is a flag that indicates if the player is still or not, you might change it's name to be is_still. This is a slightly more descriptive name, that makes it clear what the variable means.

For the method you could rename it to set_still or mark_still to indicate that it is changing the status of the player. Or combined with the above change to the variable name you could make the method name set_is_still, to make it clear exactly what variable you are setting.

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