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I got a situation like this:

struct Foo
{
    void Barry() { }
};

struct Bar : private Foo
{
    template <class F> void Bleh(F Func) { Func(); }
};

struct Fooey : public Bar
{
    void Blah() { Foo f; Bar::Bleh(std::bind(&Foo::Barry, &f)); }
};

And it doesn't compile (g++ 4.7.3). With error:

test.cpp: In member function ‘void Fooey::Blah()’:
test.cpp:4:1: error: ‘struct Foo Foo::Foo’ is inaccessible
test.cpp:15:23: error: within this context
test.cpp:4:1: error: ‘struct Foo Foo::Foo’ is inaccessible
test.cpp:15:47: error: within this context

However, if I do this:

class Fooey;
void DoStuff(Fooey* pThis);

struct Fooey : public Bar
{
    void Blah() { DoStuff(this); }
};

void DoStuff(Fooey* pThis)
{
    Foo f;
    pThis->Bleh(std::bind(&Foo::Barry, &f));
}

It compiles just fine. What is logic behind this?

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3  
Try &::Foo::Barry in the first case. –  Kerrek SB Aug 22 '13 at 17:59
    
That's it! Thanks! –  Mislav Blažević Aug 22 '13 at 18:00
    
@MislavBlažević Use public inheritance (or default public for struct) from Foo. –  Peter L. Aug 22 '13 at 18:01
    
void Blah() { ::Foo f; Bar::Bleh(std::bind(&::Foo::Barry, &f)); } Fixed it –  Mislav Blažević Aug 22 '13 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here

struct Fooey : public Bar
{
    void Blah() { Foo f; Bar::Bleh(std::bind(&Foo::Barry, &f)); }
};

name lookup for Foo finds the base class of Bar which is inaccesible because Bar inherits privately.

To fix it, qualify the name fully:

    void Blah() { ::Foo f; Bar::Bleh(std::bind(&::Foo::Barry, &f)); }
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The problem is that, inside Foo or any class derived from it, Foo is the injected class name; a name scoped inside Foo, which hides the same name for the class in the enclosing namespace. In this case, that is inaccessible due to the private inheritance.

You can work around this by explicitly referring to the name in the namespace, in this case ::Foo. Unfortunately, that will break if you move the class into another namespace.

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It's a name conflict. For each inherited type, you get a member of that name in your own class. To access the actual type, you need to refer it by its qualified name (in this case, ::Foo).

This feature lets you use shadowed or overridden members of a base class from a derived class:

struct X
{
    void Foo();
};

struct Y : public X
{
    void Foo()
    {
        X::Foo(); // calls X's implementation of Foo
    }
};

But it does mean that if you mean X as in struct X, you need to qualify it with its full name, calling it ::X.

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This is a private vs public inheritance problem. Nothing to do with naming conflicts. –  Zac Howland Aug 22 '13 at 18:02
    
@ZacHowland, then how come using ::Foo instead of just Foo works? Besides, where are we using a privately-inherited member? –  zneak Aug 22 '13 at 18:03
    
That only works because he is creating a second instance of Foo to bind with. He is using a "has a" relationship, and then creating another using composition. –  Zac Howland Aug 22 '13 at 18:08
    
He's trying to call a Foo method on a distinct Foo object from a class that (privately) inherits from Foo, and it doesn't work because the compiler thinks he's referring to a privately inherited member. Sounds very much like a situation where a name refers to two different things to me. –  zneak Aug 22 '13 at 18:11
    
Ah, I see what you are getting at now. –  Zac Howland Aug 22 '13 at 18:13

When you inherit Bar from Foo with private inheritance, you make all of Foo's member data/functions private. So when you inherit Fooey from Bar, it cannot access any of Foo's members.

For more details on private inheritance: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/access-rules-with-priv-inherit.html

struct Fooey : public Bar
{
    void Blah() { Foo f; Bar::Bleh(std::bind(&::Foo::Barry, &f)); }
};

This block, which contains the scope "fix" also creates another Foo (that is, Fooey already has a Foo object via its inheritance with Bar - this is creating another one and binding its Barry).

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