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I'm trying to understand some basic principles of pointers. Someone told me that assigning value to a pointer variable will change the actual variable value. Is that true? I wrote a piece of code and got this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
    int x=5;
    int *address_of_x = &x;
    int y = *address_of_x;
    *address_of_x = 9;
    printf("The value of x is: %d\n", x);
    printf("The X is at: %p\n", &address_of_x);
    printf("value of y = %d\n", y);
    return 0;
}

and got the output like this:

The value of x is: 9
The X is at: 0028FF04
value of y = 5

why the value of "y" stayed 5? Is that because of the ordering of commands?

share|improve this question
    
A pointer contains an address. The address points to a house. You can copy the address multiple places and that doesn't move the house, and if you erase the address that doesn't destroy the house. –  Hot Licks Aug 22 '13 at 17:59
    
(But when you use * (in a reference, not a declaration) that calls in the carpenters to duplicate the house or modify one house to look like another.) –  Hot Licks Aug 22 '13 at 18:01
1  
In most of the English-speaking world, "doubt" is not synonymous with "question"; the word "doubt" implies disbelief. –  Keith Thompson Aug 22 '13 at 18:02
    
@KeithThompson, I'm sorry.. –  Giri Aug 22 '13 at 18:15
    
@Giri: For what, writing English as you learned it? No need to apologize, I'm just clarifying. –  Keith Thompson Aug 22 '13 at 18:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

y isn't a pointer, it is an integer. This line:

int y = *address_of_x;

basically says "take the value pointed to by address_of_x and copy it into y.

If you had instead done this:

int *y = address_of_x;

Then *y would be 9.

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Yes, it is. address_of_x is assigned a pointer to x, but y is a completely independent int variable. You assign it the same value as x (through a pointer), but x and y are different variables.

At this point, assigning to *address_of_x will change the value of x, but not y.

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Yes that was because of the ordering of the commands when int y = *address_of_x; this executed the 'address_of_x' contained 5 and hence y got that value

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 +--------------+      
 |   5          |
 |*address_of_x |
 +--------------+
        ^
        |         y=*address_of_x =5
        |
 +--------------+
 | address_of_x |
 | 0028FF04     |
 +--------------+

Next time

 *address_of_x = 9

 +--------------+      
 |   9          |
 |*address_of_x |
 +--------------+
        ^
        |         but y still 5
        |
 +--------------+
 | address_of_x |
 | 0028FF04     |
 +--------------+
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You are right. Your pointer pointing to x not y. After pointer pointing to x *address_of_x will assigned to y. So y will get the value of 5.

Try to print value of x, It will changed to 9. Because *address_of_x pointing to x.

printf("value of x = %d\n", x); //output = 9
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Statement

int y = *address_of_x; 

assigns value at address_of_x to y and then after

  *address_of_x = 9;  

is modifying the variable to which address_of_x points to (which is x here), not y.

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