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I've been using several methods of calling methods. More recently, I've been using a static instance of a class, I do believe that's the proper term for it (please correct me if I'm wrong). Which is better (or even suggest ideas), and why?

The first way I was the simple old static methods.

static void exampleMethod1(){}
static void exampleMethod2(){}

The second way (someone said this is an improvement).

public class ExampleClass{

    public static ExampleClass instance;

    public ExampleClass(){
    instance = this;
    }

    public static ExampleClass getInstance(){
        return instance;
    }

    void exampleMethod1(){
        //code
    }

    void exampleMethod2(){
        //code
    } 

    // To call the method I simply getInstance().exampleMethod1    

}
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Ferdinand.kraft, Andrew, Roman C, Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera, Hot Licks Aug 22 '13 at 18:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
static instance of a class is not the correct expression. That would describe a static field of a class referencing some instance. You're talking about methods called statically on the the class type. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 22 '13 at 18:08
    
Thank you, I wasn't exactly certain what the term was. –  Jaccob Aug 22 '13 at 18:10
    
"public static instance;" what does that directly or indirectly mean . No data type :O –  Srinath Ganesh Aug 22 '13 at 18:10
    
We assign the data type in the constructor when the object is instantiated. –  Jaccob Aug 22 '13 at 18:12
    
@Jaccob You're missing the Type in that declaration. public static ??? instance; should be public static ExampleClass instance; –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 22 '13 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The term you're looking for is singleton.

Both static methods and instance methods on a singleton are okay approaches, but note that the static methods approach cannot implement an interface, so if you need to implement an interface, use a singleton.

For example:

public enum HelloWorld implements Runnable {
    INSTANCE;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Hello, world!");
    }
}

// ...
new Thread(HelloWorld.INSTANCE).start();

If your hello-world code were in a static method, it wouldn't have been able to directly implement the Runnable interface.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, thank you. –  Jaccob Aug 22 '13 at 18:15
1  
Never thought of using an enum for that, though I do use them to implement Comparator<T>. Cool :) –  StormeHawke Aug 22 '13 at 18:22
    
@StormeHawke It's called the "enum singleton pattern", and is described in Item 3 of Effective Java 2nd ed. That book is well worth reading, and I think every Java programmer should read it. :-D –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 22 '13 at 18:48
    
@StormeHawke Google I/O 2008 - Effective Java Reloaded Start at 28:50. –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 22 '13 at 18:53
    
I likes, I likes :) –  StormeHawke Aug 22 '13 at 19:01

If all the methods are static, and you don't need initializing the class or have class members then just make a static utility class.

A static class with only static functions is just fine.

As chris answered above me, it sounds like you are looking for a singleton, which you should use only if you do have non static aspects to your class, but you want to limit the number of instances of it.

public static class GeneralFunctions
{
    public static class ArrayFunctions
    {
         public static void OnArray{};
    }

    public static class PrintingFunctions
    {
        public static void PrintBuffer(byte[] buffer){};
        public static void PrintQword(ulong qword){};
    }
}
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Haha, I've been taught that having such static utility classes are "bad" programming. –  Jaccob Aug 22 '13 at 18:14
    
Please explain why. –  TomF Aug 22 '13 at 18:15

You can have a class with only static methods, and the methods can (if needed) use static fields in the class for their persistent data. Or you can use a "singleton" class instance to do roughly the same thing with instance methods and instance fields.

In general, if you have a class that consists only of methods that have no state (eg, the Math class), you should make the methods static and not have/allow an instance. If the methods must have some shared state, however, it's probably wiser to have some sort of "singleton" implementation.

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It is never "wiser" to have a singleton, its a last resort if you have to. –  TomF Aug 22 '13 at 18:29
    
I think that it might be a good idea to make it a non-static class anyway, even if there's no state, if it's conceivable that sometime in the future the implementation could change to one that will require state. Then, if that does happen, you won't have to change all the code that uses the class. The Math class would be an example where it isn't conceivable that state would ever be needed. But it really depends on what the class represents and what the methods in it are for, and of course we can't tell with a class like ExampleClass. –  ajb Aug 22 '13 at 18:44
    
@TomF - There are several advantages to a singleton. For instance, you can easily (and configurably) subclass a singleton, something that's awkward at best with an all-static class. (But I do agree that singletons tend to be used as a first resort when there are many better options. But this has nothing to do with static methods.) –  Hot Licks Aug 22 '13 at 18:54
    
I am currently working mainly in c++ embedded systems, so believe me i know my way around a singleton. Still, unless you NEED a singleton, you shouldn't use one because it is "easy" or "readable". –  TomF Aug 22 '13 at 18:55
    
@TomF - Oddly, I rarely need to use them. –  Hot Licks Aug 22 '13 at 20:16

To make a proper singleton you must make the constructor private. The static final declaration ensures that instance will be initialized when the class is first loaded. This is the simplest way to create singletons in Java, but note that there are other ways.

public class ExampleClass
{
    private final static ExampleClass instance = new ExampleClass();

    private ExampleClass()
    {
        // prevents instantiation
    }

    public static ExampleClass getInstance()
    {
        return instance;
    }

    void exampleMethod1()
    {
        //code
    }

    void exampleMethod2()
    {
        //code
    }     
}

To get an instance of the class:

ExampleClass exampleClass = ExampleClass.getInstance();
exampleClass.exampleMethod1();
share|improve this answer
    
The simplest way is to use an enum, as Chris did in his answer. No worries with multi-threaded apps. –  GriffeyDog Aug 22 '13 at 18:35

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