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I have a problem with thread not sleeping.
I can't put here my whole code. so, to reproduce, here is a basic code waiting 5 seconds.

try {
    int millisec = 5000;
    System.out.println(new Date());
    System.out.println("We wait " + millisec + " milliseconds");
    Thread.sleep(millisec);
    System.out.println(new Date());
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

output :

Thu Aug 22 20:01:42 CEST 2013
We wait 5000 milliseconds
Thu Aug 22 20:01:47 CEST 2013

Everything is OK.
But when I put this code in a thread, no sleep. Example with this code :

try {
    Thread aThread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                int millisec = 5000;
                System.out.println(new Date());
                System.out.println("We wait " + millisec + " milliseconds");
                Thread.sleep(millisec);
                System.out.println(new Date());
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    });
    aThread.start();
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

output :

Thu Aug 22 20:07:30 CEST 2013
We wait 5000 milliseconds

...and nothing else, the thread is terminated.
I don't understand why. Please, any ideas ?

EDIT : I use Eclipse and JUnit to test.

share|improve this question
1  
Does your process itself stay alive beyond 5 seconds? –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '13 at 18:34
3  
Your code works for me. You sure your IDE isn't cutting off the output or something? –  Gray Aug 22 '13 at 18:37
2  
Works for me too, clean and try again. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 22 '13 at 18:38
    
It shouldn't be necessary, but just to be safe, try adding some more println statements after the sleep (just print a bunch of garbage). Maybe your console is buffering the output for some reason. –  increment1 Aug 22 '13 at 18:52
    
I use Eclipse and Junit to test. If it's ok for you, the problem is in my IDE. I'll have a look. Thanks for your prompt replys ! –  jack-y Aug 22 '13 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Edit:

The issue turned out to be how JUnit works. It does not know that background threads were spawned so when the test thread completes, it kills the rest of the threads without waiting for them.


Your code properly spits out both date lines when I try it in a small main() class. Here are some possibilities as to why you aren't seeing the output in your application:

  • The thread that is spawning the aThread may be a daemon thread itself. The aThread is therefore daemon because its daemon status is gotten from the spawning thread's status. If the JVM finishes before the 2nd System.out.println(...) the aThread will be killed. If there is a question about it, you should do:

    Thread aThread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
    ...
    // ensure the deamon flag is off _before_ we start the thread
    aThread.setDaemon(false);
    aThread.start();
    
  • Another possibility is that something is actually closing System.out before the 2nd println(...);. Unlikely but possible. Are you using shutdown hooks at all for cleanup?

  • A third possibility is that the output is actually being printed but your IDE or your console is somehow not displaying the output.

  • Another possibility is that the System.out.println(...); threw an IOException. It might be interesting to check the value of System.out.checkError() to see if it is true although I'm not sure how you would then display it.

One thing to try is to create a temporary file instead of printing output. Something like:

new File("/var/tmp/" + System.currentTimeMillis()).createNewFile();

Then you should see 2 files in "/var/tmp" (or wherever a temp directory on your OS is).

You should also try changing System.out to System.err to see if that changes anything. Doubtful but worth a try.

If these don't work as well then something is killing the JVM forcefully so it can't wait for the background threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Possibility 1 : aThread.setDaemon(false) added, no change for me. –  jack-y Aug 22 '13 at 18:56
    
Possibility 3 : yes, I use Eclipse and JUnit, this could be the reason. Thanks ! –  jack-y Aug 22 '13 at 18:57
1  
There is actually another (unlikely) possibility: an Error is thrown somewhere which is not caught by catch (Exception e) and the thread is terminated silently –  Katona Aug 22 '13 at 18:57
    
Good one @Katona. Unlikely but possible. The System.out.println(...) might also have thrown an internal exception that is being caught and blocked. I've added that. –  Gray Aug 22 '13 at 19:02
    
I've edited my answer @jack-y with some things to try. –  Gray Aug 22 '13 at 19:03

Well I think you didn't call join() in your main thread (if you using the JUnit then the thread calling the test case and creating the thread object).

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, adding aThread.join() after the start solves for the JUnit test. Unfortunately I can't put this in my production application. Thanks for the help. –  jack-y Aug 23 '13 at 5:07
    
Thread.join works if you have one worker thread, else something like ConcurrentUnit can help. –  Jonathan Aug 30 '13 at 20:09

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