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I'm trying to wrap my head around this problem. The below code ultimately merely counts the number of garbage collected objects of type SubscribersClass. When the code runs as shown, I get a SubscribersClass.Count value of 0. When I comment out the first line in EventsClass and uncomment the remainder of that class, the value of SubscribersClass.Count is 10.

The only thing I can come up with is that because there is something wrong with the EventsClass EventHandler (as shown), then no instances of SubscribersClass are actually being created.

Was hoping someone could help me to understand what is happening exactly.

This is an academic and of no practical value. Just tying to figure it out but have thus far only managed to get GoogleBlisters.

namespace understandingEvents
{
    public class EventsClass
    {
        public event EventHandler SomeEvent;  // if this is commented out and
                                              // remainder of class is uncommented
                                              // it works fine
        /*
        public event EventHandler SomeEvent
        {
             add
             {
                 Console.WriteLine("An event has been added");
             }
             remove
             {
                 Console.WriteLine("An event has been removed");
             }
         }
         */
    }

    public class SubscribersClass
    {
        static int count = 0;

        static public int Count
        {
            get { return count; }
        }

        public  SubscribersClass (EventsClass eventPublisher)
        {
            eventPublisher.SomeEvent += new EventHandler(Subscriber_SomeEvent);
        }

        ~SubscribersClass()
        {
            Interlocked.Increment(ref count);
        }

        public void Subscriber_SomeEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This is an event");
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            EventsClass publisher = new EventsClass();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                SubscribersClass subscriber = new SubscribersClass(publisher);
                subscriber = null;
            }

            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Console.WriteLine(SubscribersClass.Count.ToString());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you use a standard, compiler implemented event (public event EventHandler SomeEvent;), subscribing to the event causes a reference to the subscriber to be kept in the event, since the delegate refers to an instance method of the SubscribersClass.

This means that publisher is still holding references to each and every subscriber, so they are never released.

When you write your own add and remove handlers, you're not actually using the delegate, so the delegate is ignored (you'll find that raising the event has no effect and isn't handled by the subscribers in that case), which also means that those references aren't held, so the GC.Collect call can "clean up" the subscribers. This causes the count to increment.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Reed. Makes perfect sense. – deadEddie Aug 22 '13 at 19:52

When you subscribe to an event, the publisher will hold a reference to the subscriber. This is what allows the publisher to call all the methods that were subscribed to the event when the event takes place.

To solve your issue, simply remove the subscription before destroying the object. ( You'll need to store a reference to the publisher of the event). You can do this by manually calling some Unsubscribe method or (better) implement IDisposable and unsubscribe in Dispose().

public  SubscribersClass (EventsClass eventPublisher)
    {
        m_eventPublisher = eventPublisher;
        eventPublisher.SomeEvent += new EventHandler(Subscriber_SomeEvent);
    }


public override void Dispose()
{
        m_eventPublisher.SomeEvent -= Subscriber_SomeEvent;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your suggested fix makes not much sense - there is no point to stopping listening to event in finalizer, even ignoring the fact that using other managed objects in finalizer is questionable... – Alexei Levenkov Aug 22 '13 at 19:38
    
@AlexeiLevenkov - I agree about the accessing other objects in the finalizer, that was a silly mistake on my part. The proper place is in a normal method or as part of Dispose. I'll fix my answer. If we ignore the place where I put the unsubscribe code - why doesn't it make sense to unsubscribe before you "die"? – Vadim Aug 22 '13 at 19:45
    
It makes perfect sense to unsubscribe when you no longer interested in the event (which Dispose is good place for when listener is IDisposable for other reasons). Just doing it in finilizer is at very least useless - your object will be kept alive by source of the event, so it will not be eligible for GC till source is eligible - and in this case there is no point to unsubscribe. – Alexei Levenkov Aug 22 '13 at 19:52
    
@AlexeiLevenkov - thanks for correcting me. – Vadim Aug 23 '13 at 6:11

You are not removing event susbscribers in your test code, as result the SubscribersClass instances are not getting collected.

Commented out code does not at all add listeners, so all instances of SubscribersClass are ready for GC as soon as they are created.

Note that code (when properly fixed) will also behave differently in DEBUG build due to extended lifetime of all variables. Consider putting all interesting code in a function and triggering GC outside it.

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