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i try to print values into a file but my results are cutted when longer then 4 digits:

import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.math.BigInteger;

public class create_referencevalues {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Long[] list = { 10L, 40L, 90L, 160L, 250L, 350L, 500L, 650L, 800L,
                1000L };

        try {
            java.io.PrintStream p = new java.io.PrintStream(
                    new java.io.BufferedOutputStream(
                            new java.io.FileOutputStream(new java.io.File(
                                    "C:/users/djdeejay/listall.csv"), false)));
            for (long i = 0; i < 1024; i++) {
                //p.print(Long.toBinaryString(i));
                Long sum1 = 0L;
                for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
                    if (BigInteger.valueOf(i).testBit(j)) {
                        sum1 += (list[j]);
                    }
                }

                p.println( i + ";"+sum1);

            }

            p.close();
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}

Here are the 5 last values as printed:

1018;3750
1019;3760
1020;3800
1021;3810
1022;3840
1023;3850

last should be: 38500

what do I miss here ???

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2  
This sounds like a great opportunity to learn to use a debugger. Step through your code while examining the state of your program, and pinpoint where its behaviour diverges from your expectations. –  NPE Aug 22 '13 at 19:12
    
@djdeejay: Yup. If using Eclipse for example, set a breakpoint and use debug mode. You can step through your code one line at a time and see what's stored in every variable at every line. That way, you can see where the mistakes/errors are occurring and fix them. –  Andrew Martin Aug 22 '13 at 19:16
    
What makes you say the last result should be 38500? 10 + 40 + 90 160 + 250 + 350 + 500 + 650 + 800 + 1000 is 3850, as is printed. –  andersschuller Aug 22 '13 at 19:18
    
for (Integer i = 1023; i >= 0; i--) { // p.print(Long.toBinaryString(i)); Long sum1 = 0L; for (Integer j = 0; j < 10; j++) { if (BigInteger.valueOf(i).testBit(j)) { sum1 += (list[j]); } } sum1*= Integer.bitCount(i); p.println(i + ";" + sum1); System.out.println(sum1); } –  gone Aug 22 '13 at 19:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with the println. Your code does exactly what I'd expect it to do. Consider the last line, which you claim isn't correct:

1023;3850

The decimal 1023 is 1111111111 in binary. Therefore when i=1023, the inner loop of your program would simply compute the sum of all numbers in list. These numbers add up to 3850, which is what gets printed.

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The last one should actually be 3850 and not 38500. When i = 1023 all bits are set and the last line will be the same as if you add all numbers in list[] together.

1000+650+800+500+350+250+160+90+40+10 = 3850

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