Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is a bit similar to this one: How to convert an action to a defined delegate of the same signature?

Why there is no implicit convertion between delegates with same signature. For example, code:

class Program
{
    private delegate void Foo1(int x);
    private delegate void Foo2(int x);


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Foo1 foo1 = Console.WriteLine;
        Foo2 foo2 = Console.WriteLine;

        Call(foo1);

        Call2(foo2);
    }

    static void Call(Action<int> action)
    {
        action(10);
    }

    static void Call2(Foo1 action)
    {
        action(10);
    }
}

it does not compile because there isn't implicit convertion from Action<int> to Foo1. But normaly it's the same thing. So it mean this names are aliases, not actualy names. So i think it was great idea to think about it like aliases. So in this case we have 3 aliases of a delegate, that get one int value and returns nothing. And this delegates are fully interchangeable one by another. But we don't have it. So question is: why? By signatures it's the same thing, and there isn't any implementation, so delegates with same signature are one and same with many aliases...

Is it C# defect or there are reasons for it? As to me, i don't see any.

share|improve this question
4  
I don't consider this a defect, personally, but this is why I get annoyed when people define their own delegates instead of just using Action/Func. –  Servy Aug 22 '13 at 20:30

1 Answer 1

There's no implicit conversion between those two delegates for the same reason that there's no implicit conversion between these two types:

public sealed class Foo1
{
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

public sealed class Foo2
{
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

Just because two classes have the same fields doesn't mean that you should be able to treat one as if it were another. The same logic applies to delegates (which are also types, mind you).

There is semantic meaning applied to the creation of that type. If someone created a Foo1 they want it to be a Foo1, not a Foo2. If they're going out of their way to use a Foo1 where a Foo2 is expected, it's a big red flag that even though the types appear similar, there is a semantic difference between these two types. If the programmer knows something that the compiler doesn't, they can use an explicit conversion of some sort to indicate that they know what they're doing.

(The previous paragraph was intentionally written to apply equally to your delegates, and the classes I provided above.)

share|improve this answer
    
No. Classes can be partial, can be inherited an so on. For example i have Action<int,int,int>. I don't want to write simple/XML comment about what is it, i can simply write something like MySpecialDelegate = Action<int,int,int> and it's just a self-documenting code. For classes it could be a nice functionalty, but for them it will be used not frequently, because almost ever this two classes are not the same, but delegates - are. When i'm writeng using MyAlarmTimer = System.Timers.Timer i don't mean 'a big red flag`, i just want to simplify some code and explain it without comments –  Alex Joukovsky Aug 22 '13 at 21:13
1  
Why i can't do the same here - i dunno. Like in this case it's just an alias, for running code there is no difference between them. And if all delegates in .Net was auto-convertible to Action/Func - it will be very nice –  Alex Joukovsky Aug 22 '13 at 21:15
    
@AlexJoukovsky Not all methods with the same signature are the same. It's quite possible that the semantic meaning of the method holds more to it. You may not use different delegates to attach that semantic meaning, but that doesn't mean that nobody does, or that the language designers assumed that it shouldn't be done. As for the classes being partial, that's not really relevant; once they get compiled by the compiler it's just one class definition. As for being inherited, they can be sealed; I added that to my example if it makes you feel better. –  Servy Aug 23 '13 at 13:44
    
"Not all methods with the same signature are the same". They have the same signature! It sounds like "Two mans, having same firstname, secondname and lastname and the same SIN but with different nicknames are not the same man" –  Alex Joukovsky Aug 26 '13 at 7:21
    
@AlexJoukovsky First off, the methods don't need to have the same name. Next, just because two people have the same name doesn't mean they're the same person. That you think all methods that have the same signature do the same thing is...I don't even know what to say to that. How many methods have you ever written that accept no arguments and return no values? Did they all do the same thing? –  Servy Aug 26 '13 at 13:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.