Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anybody explain why DateTime in IronRuby is Object[] sample code

IronRuby 0.9.1.0 on .NET 2.0.50727.4927
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

>>> require 'System'
=> true
>>> t = System::DateTime.Now
=> Thu Dec 03 15:32:42 +05:00 2009
>>> t.is_a?(Time)
=> true
>>> t.is_a?(System::DateTime)
=> true
>>> t.is_a?(System::Object)
=> true
>>> t.is_a?(System::Object[])
=> true
>>> t.is_a?(System::Decimal)
=> false
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using [] for generic types is a justifiable syntax for Ruby, but the current behavior you see (using [] on a non-generic type) is a open bug: http://ironruby.codeplex.com/WorkItem/View.aspx?WorkItemId=3355

In Ruby, square brackets are only used for indexing into an array, not define a type-array ... as there is no need for defining the type of a Ruby array. Ruby allows overloading whatever [] means against any object, and Ruby's Class object doesn't have a meaning for [], so we've defined [] to mean getting a generic type. Keep in mind that the of method is the preferred method to use; [] is really only there for convenience and similar syntax with IronPython.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Because System::Object[] is not really an array type. *t.is_a?(System::DateTime[])* will return true as well.

I think that what happens here, is that IronRuby considers the square brackets as empty generic type indicators (because creating a generic type is done with the same syntax, for example, System::Collections::Generic::List[String].new).

The right way to do so is as follows:

IronRuby 0.9.3.0 on .NET 2.0.50727.4927
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

>>> t = System::DateTime.new
=> 01/01/0001 00:00:00
>>> t.is_a? System::Array.of(System::Object)
=> false
share|improve this answer
    
it is a very weird, square bracket always used by ruby's array syntax. Why mix? Anyway thanks a lot. –  Sergey Mirvoda Dec 3 '09 at 11:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.