Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Wanting to do something like this

iptables -I INPUT ! -s $IP_1 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j DROP
iptables -I INPUT ! -s $IP_2 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j DROP
iptables -I INPUT ! -s $IP_3 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j DROP

Where the server port is the same for all, but the allowed ip's can be different.... from what I know of iptables this wouldn't work as IP_3 would be dropped from the first rule... so how do I get something like this to work?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Filburt, Mark, talonmies, Luc M, Codie CodeMonkey Aug 23 '13 at 2:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions on professional server, networking, or related infrastructure administration are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve programming or programming tools. You may be able to get help on Server Fault." – Luc M, Codie CodeMonkey
  • "Questions about general computing hardware and software are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve tools used primarily for programming. You may be able to get help on Super User." – Filburt, Mark, talonmies
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

2 Answers 2

Those rules will drop all tcp packets destined for $SERVER_PORT. The first rule says if the source ip address isn't equal to $IP_1 then drop it. No further processing is done, since the rule was correctly matched. If the ip address is equal to $IP_1, then it will go to the second rule which will drop it for the same reason, assuming $IP_1 != $IP_2. In fact all tcp packets destined for $SERVER_PORT will be dropped without ever getting to rule 3.

Instead, do:

iptables -A INPUT -s $IP_1 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $IP_2 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $IP_3 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -j DROP

Remember to flush the rules first if you have no other rules: iptables -F.

share|improve this answer
    
lol... thanks.. well your solution is what I wanted to know anyway, mine was just an example of how I wanted it to work, but yeh I can see now how it would drop the IP_1 on the next rule for IP_2 :D –  user1681751 Aug 22 '13 at 23:52
    
How safe is it to try that rule though... I mean "iptables -A INPUT -j DROP" at the end.. won't that just drop all connections that don't meet the above rules? I only want it to drop all other ip's for that specific dport that don't meet the rules.. while the rest of my server ports will work as normal....?? –  user1681751 Aug 22 '13 at 23:55
    
Yes that's correct - it will drop all other packets - I thought that's what you meant when you said "drop the rest". If you want to keep other ports open, e.g. ssh, then replace the last line with: iptables -A INPUT --dport $SERVER_PORT -j DROP In general, anytime you are configuring the firewall, you want to be able to log in to the console directly, as opposed to ssh, in case something goes wrong. –  Matt Aug 23 '13 at 0:29
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

hmm would this work?

iptables -A INPUT -s $IP_1 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $IP_2 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $IP_3 -p tcp --dport $SERVER_PORT -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp -s 0.0.0.0/0 --dport $SERVER_PORT -j DROP
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.