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Say I've just implemented some class in Python and want to overload say the '-' operator, but can't remember if I need to use __subtract__, __minus__, or in fact the correct answer __sub__. Is there a quick way to find this out via the interpreter? I tried simple things like help(-) but no success.

There's plenty of online resources to give the definitive list of available operators, but I'm looking for a quick offline method.

For common operators one quickly memorizes them, but some lesser used ones often need looking up.

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

All standard operators

>>> help('SPECIALMETHODS')

Only basic ones

>>> help('BASICMETHODS')

Only numeric ones

>>> help('NUMBERMETHODS')

Other help subsections

>>> help('ATTRIBUTEMETHODS')
>>> help('CALLABLEMETHODS')
>>> help('MAPPINGMETHODS')
>>> help('SEQUENCEMETHODS1')
>>> help('SEQUENCEMETHODS2')
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The advantage of destrobu's and Leif Anderson's solutions is that they even work for not-quite-special dunder methods. For example, if you can't remember what pickle uses, you can find __reduce__ on any pickleable type, even though you can't find it in SPECIALMETHODS. But for actual special methods like __sub__, this is definitely the cleanest and simplest way to do it. (As long as you can figure out what to search for in the many pages of text, of course.) –  abarnert Aug 22 '13 at 23:14
    
@abarnert "As long as you can figure out what to search for": added shortcut to numeric ones only help. –  Vanni Totaro Aug 22 '13 at 23:21
1  
Yeah, that definitely helps. (And you get that list at the end of help('SPECIALMETHODS'), so you don't have to remember all of them. –  abarnert Aug 22 '13 at 23:32
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Use dir(obj), that will list all attributes of the object (or class) obj. For example you know that you can add integers so type

>>> dir(int) # using the class int (or type in this case) here
    ['__abs__',
 '__add__',
 '__and__',
 '__class__',
 '__cmp__',
 ...

or for formatted output

>>> print '\n'.join(dir(1)) # using an instance of int here
__abs__
__add__
__and__
__class__
__cmp__
...

then you can get more information via

>>> help(int.__add__)
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1  
You can't do that until you've implemented the method, in which case you obviously know what it's called. –  user2357112 Aug 22 '13 at 22:59
1  
Just do it for an object, where you know that it works. This helps if you cant remember if was __minus__ or __sub__. –  dastrobu Aug 22 '13 at 23:01
    
Yup, print '\n'.join(dir(1)) works nicely for listing the special methods on an int. –  Johnsyweb Aug 22 '13 at 23:07
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Here's a start.

>>> import operator
>>> print("\n".join(dir(operator)))
__abs__
__add__
__and__
__concat__
__contains__
__delitem__
__doc__
__eq__
__floordiv__
__ge__
__getitem__
__gt__
__iadd__
__iand__
__iconcat__
__ifloordiv__
__ilshift__
__imod__
__imul__
__index__
__inv__
__invert__
__ior__
__ipow__
__irshift__
__isub__
__itruediv__
__ixor__
__le__
__loader__
__lshift__
__lt__
__mod__
__mul__
__name__
__ne__
__neg__
__not__
__or__
__package__
__pos__
__pow__
__rshift__
__setitem__
__sub__
__truediv__
__xor__
_compare_digest
abs
add
and_
attrgetter
concat
contains
countOf
delitem
eq
floordiv
ge
getitem
gt
iadd
iand
iconcat
ifloordiv
ilshift
imod
imul
index
indexOf
inv
invert
ior
ipow
irshift
is_
is_not
isub
itemgetter
itruediv
ixor
le
lshift
lt
methodcaller
mod
mul
ne
neg
not_
or_
pos
pow
rshift
setitem
sub
truediv
truth
xor
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Use bpython (or bpython3 for python 3).

It's like the normal python repl, but with tab complete goodness.

So for example, I make the code:

class a:
    def __

I'll get a menu with all of the built in functions.

You can get it via the bpython website

Or via doing a sudo apt-get install bpython in ubuntu. (or sudo apt-get install bpython3 for python3.

Additionally, ipython has tab complete features, and is more widespread.


One nice trick is to use tab completion to make guesses. You can't remember whether it's minus, sub, subtract, or something else, right? So, first type int.__m and hit tab:

In [470]: int.__m
int.__mod__     int.__module__  int.__mro__     int.__mul__

There's no minus there, so backspace, type s, and tab again:

In [470]: int.__s
int.__setattr__        int.__sub__            int.__subclasshook__
int.__sizeof__         int.__subclasscheck__  
int.__str__            int.__subclasses__ 

And there it is.

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It's probably worth mentioning that ipython—which is a lot more popular and widespread—has the same tab-completion functionality, as do a number of fancier IDEs. –  abarnert Aug 22 '13 at 23:05
    
Good point, added to answer. –  Leif Andersen Aug 22 '13 at 23:06
1  
It may also be worth mentioning that tab completion can let you try out guesses. For example, type int.__m, then tab to see the completions, see there's no minus, backspace and try s, then tab to see the completions, and see there's a sub, and you're done. That's the way I actually do this myself most of the time… That's hard to explain; let me edit your answer and you can revert if you don't like it. –  abarnert Aug 22 '13 at 23:10
    
Good point, thanks for adding that. –  Leif Andersen Aug 22 '13 at 23:18
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