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Is it possible to infer the return type of a templated member function in a CRTP base class?

While inferring argument types works well, it fails with the return type. Consider the example below.

#include <iostream>

template <typename Derived>
struct base
{
  template <typename R, typename T>
  R f(T x)
  {
    return static_cast<Derived&>(*this).f_impl(x);
  }
};

struct derived : base<derived>
{
  bool f_impl(int x)
  {
    std::cout << "f(" << x << ")" << std::endl;
    return true;
  }
};

int main()
{
  bool b = derived{}.f(42);
  return b ? 0 : 1;
}

This produces the following error:

  bool b = derived{}.f(42);
           ~~~~~~~~~~^
crtp.cc:7:5: note: candidate template ignored: couldn't infer template argument 'R'
  R f(T x)
    ^
1 error generated.

My intuitive assumption is that if the compiler is capable of inferring type int for the argument to f, it should also work for the return bool, because both types are known at template instantiation time.

I tried using the trailing return type function syntax, but then failed to find a working expression to put in decltype.

EDIT 1

For the case where the function has one or more templated arguments, Dietmar Kühl provided a solution based on delaying template instantiation using on layer of indirection. Unfotunately, this does not work when a base class function does not have any argument, like this:

template <typename R>
R g()
{
  return static_cast<Derived&>(*this).g_impl();
}

Attempts to use the same technique fail because there exist no dependent types. How does one handle this case?

EDIT 2

As pointed out by Johannes Schaub, C++11 features default template arguments, so it is always possible to make g dependent on an arbitrary type and then apply Dietmar's solution:

template <typename T = void>
auto g() -> typename g_impl_result<Derived, T>::type
{
  return static_cast<Derived&>(*this).g_impl();
}

EDIT 3

This problem does not exist in C++14 anymore, since we have return type deduction for normal functions, allowing us to write simply:

template <typename Derived>
struct base
{
  template <typename T>
  auto f(T x)
  {
    return static_cast<Derived&>(*this).f_impl(x);
  }

  auto g()
  {
    return static_cast<Derived&>(*this).g_impl();
  }
};

struct derived : base<derived>
{
  bool f_impl(int x)
  {
    return true;
  }

  double g_impl()
  {
    return 4.2;
  }
};
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

An extra indirection is your friend:

template <typename D, typename T>
struct f_impl_result
{
    typedef decltype(static_cast<D*>(0)->f_impl(std::declval<T>())) type;
};

template <typename Derived>
struct base
{
    template <typename T>
    auto f(T x) -> typename f_impl_result<Derived, T>::type
    {
        return static_cast<Derived&>(*this).f_impl(x);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reason you used the old ((D*)0)->foo() trick to declval? –  Red XIII Aug 23 '13 at 8:47
    
@RedXIII: no. I should have used std::declval<D>(). –  Dietmar Kühl Aug 23 '13 at 12:43
    
@DietmarKühl Why is it impossible to declare the return type directly in base? –  Walter Aug 23 '13 at 13:11
    
+1 for a working solution to the problem, but why is this indirection necessary, as @Walter points out? Is it generally impossible to find a direct solution inside the base class? –  Matthias Vallentin Aug 23 '13 at 16:01
2  
@MatthiasVallentin fortunately C++11 has default template arguments so you can always add template<typename T = void>. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 23 '13 at 18:23

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