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I am currently building a Windows Store App that uses cryptography. This means extensive use of the CryptographicBuffer class. The app is very security-sensitive, so I would like to make sure to Zeroize any Buffer's immediately after use. I am doing the same thing with byte[]'s when I use them.

To Zeroize them, currently we'd like to:

  • Write all 1's.
  • Write a pattern. Currently using 0,1,2,...254,255,0,1...
  • Write all 0's.

The solution I have come up with is to create an extension method for each of IBuffer and byte[] which will do this for me. For byte[] I believe it's pretty straightforward:

public static void Zeroize(this byte[] bytes)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
         bytes[i] = 255;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        bytes[i] = (byte)(i % 255);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        bytes[i] = 0;
    }
}

For IBuffer, it's a little bit more difficult, in that you don't seem to get direct access to the Buffer. Through System.Runtime.InteropServices.WindowsRuntime; you do seem to get a few useful methods, such as IBuffer.CopyTo and IBuffer.AsStream, which give you direct access to the Buffer or underlying Stream. The solution I have come up with is this:

public static void Zeroize(this IBuffer buffer)
{
    var capacity = buffer.Capacity;
    byte[] toWrite = new byte[capacity];
    for (int i = 0; i < capacity; i++)
    {
        toWrite[i] = 255;
    }

    toWrite.AsBuffer().CopyTo(buffer);

    for (int i = 0; i < capacity; i++)
    {
        toWrite[i] = (byte)(i % 255);
    }

    toWrite.AsBuffer().CopyTo(buffer);

    for (int i = 0; i < capacity; i++)
    {
            toWrite[i] = 0;
    }

    toWrite.AsBuffer().CopyTo(buffer);
}

My questions are thus: Is there a better way to be doing this? Is there any other hidden methods (InteropServices isn't really advertised all that well) that would make this a bit easier/more efficient/more secure?

Note: I realize the Zeroization process may be overkill, but it is requested by the Owner.

share|improve this question
1  
Without using direct memory pinning (ie. using the unsafe and fixed methods) can you be sure you're actually overwriting the right memory at all in a method you can't see? Performance wise, if the buffer is always a fixed size you could just create your zeroing arrays statically in advance and overwrite the memory blocks with them at the end rather than regenerating the same data in a loop each time. –  Max Aug 23 '13 at 0:54
    
Your first step currently is writing all 1s actually. –  owlstead Aug 23 '13 at 1:14
    
@owlstead: Ah, that's what I meant actually. Fixing in the post. @Max: Unfortunately WinRT is unable to use unsafe methods. I'm not sure about fixed though. I think based on the doc, Streams and Buffers all access the same set of memory for their duration. With Streams you also have to do Seeking, Flushing, etc. As to the fixed size of the buffer, that's a good idea! We've got a few standard sizes instances and a bunch of non-standard ones, so maybe making one for standard and one for non-standard would work well. I'll do some tests on the effects of that. Thanks for that idea! –  Nate Diamond Aug 23 '13 at 1:54
    
@Max Ah, I see that fixed requires unsafe, so that is unfortunately not an option. –  Nate Diamond Aug 23 '13 at 2:15

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