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Multi-choice question: What is the result of the following code?

int x=0;
switch(x)
{
  case 1: printf( "One" );
  case 0: printf( "Zero" );
  case 2: printf( "Hello World" );
}

Options:

  1. One
  2. Zero
  3. Hello World
  4. ZeroHello World

I assumed it would only return Zero. I have played around with what the int value is and it changed the output but I can't follow what is happening here.

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closed as off-topic by Jim Balter, Grijesh Chauhan, Kerrek SB, abligh, chrylis Mar 2 '14 at 7:38

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – Kerrek SB, abligh, chrylis
  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Jim Balter, Grijesh Chauhan
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"I assumed it would only return Zero." -- Why? Assumptions are no substitute for studying and learning at least the basics of a programming language. (Also, nothing is returned.) Please read this: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/182266/… –  Jim Balter Aug 23 '13 at 1:24

5 Answers 5

It's 4, ZeroHelloWorld. This is because you are not using a break. What is happening is that your code (properly) gets to the case 0 and executes that code. But then what happens is it keeps going (hence the Hello World). To prevent this you need to use a break statement, like so -

int x=0;

switch(x){
case 1:
    printf("One");
    break;

case 0: 
    printf("Zero");
    break;

case 2:
    printf("Hello World");
    break;
}

And this will actually say just zero.

You can see your problem more clearly if you set x to 1. Then you will print out OneZeroHello World.

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Thank you I didnt recognize that there were no breaks –  Nik Brkic Aug 23 '13 at 19:03

Just elaborating on previous answers.

In C (and other flavours of it), cases in switch statements are used as labels. Based on the value of the x, it will go to the correct case statement but then it will go through every other case statements below that, unless you have a 'break' statement.

Other than that, it is a good idea to use a default at end also, so that if the value of X is something other than 0,1 or 2, the behaviour is still predictable. I guess that means your code should look like,

int x=0;
switch(x)
{
  case 1: printf( "One" );
          break;
  case 0: printf( "Zero" );
          break;
  case 2: printf( "Hello World" );
          break;

  default: printf("X is out of range, it was %d\n", x);
}

You don't need a break statement for default, since it is the last one anyway.

Look here for the syntax.

Hope this helps,

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The case label only determines at what point in the switch the execution of the code begins. Once the switch is entered, unless there is a break, the code execution will "flow through" and continue to execute.

So the switch is entered at case 0:, and Zero will be printed. Since there's no break, the next statement is executed as well and your output will be ZeroHello World

If you want only Zero as the output, you need:

int x=0;
switch(x)
{
      case 1: printf( "One" ); 
         break;    // note the "break"
      case 0: printf( "Zero" ); 
         break;         
      case 2: printf( "Hello World" ); 
         break;
}

The break will cause execution to stop after printf("Zero"); and will exit the switch.

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In C case statements "fall through" i.e. the case statement wil start executing on the first true condition and continue util the end of the case statement or an "exit" is encountered.

You need to explicitly exit like so.

int x=0;
    switch(x)
    {
    case 1: printf( "One" );
            break;
    case 0: printf( "Zero" );
            break;
    case 2: printf( "Hello World" );
    }
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result is 4. Actually x in switch(x) just indicates the "starting point" of the execution. You need "break" to break the execution. So without break, the switch will start execute the statements from case x until it executes all following cases.

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