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I want to calculate the 10 second difference of a dataset where the time increments are irregular.The data exists in 2 1-D arrays of equal length, one for the time, and the other for the data value.

After some poking around I was able to come up with a solution, but it's too slow based on (i suspect) having to iterate through every item in the array.

My general method is to iterate through the time array, and for each time value i find the index of the time value that is x seconds earlier. I then use those indices on the data array to calculate the difference.

The code is shown below.

First, the find_closest function from Bi Rico

def find_closest(A, target):
    #A must be sorted
    idx = A.searchsorted(target)
    idx = np.clip(idx, 1, len(A)-1)
    left = A[idx-1]
    right = A[idx]
    idx -= target - left < right - target
    return idx

Which I then use in the following manner

def trailing_diff(time_array,data_array,seconds):
    trailing_list=[]
    for i in xrange(len(time_array)):
        now=time_array[i]
        if now<seconds:
            trailing_list.append(0)
        else:
            then=find_closest(time_array,now-seconds)
            trailing_list.append(data_array[i]-data_array[then])
    return np.asarray(trailing_list)

unfortunately this doesn't scale particularly well, and I'd like to be able to calculate this (and plot it) on the fly.

Any thoughts on how I can make it more expedient?

EDIT: input/output

In [48]:time1
Out[48]:
array([  0.57200003,   0.579     ,   0.58800006,   0.59500003,
         0.5999999 ,   1.05999994,   1.55900002,   2.00900006,
         2.57599998,   3.05599999,   3.52399993,   4.00699997,
         4.09599996,   4.57299995,   5.04699993,   5.52099991,
         6.09299994,   6.55999994,   7.04099989,   7.50900006,
         8.07500005,   8.55799985,   9.023     ,   9.50699997,
         9.59399986,  10.07200003,  10.54200006,  11.01999998,
        11.58899999,  12.05699992,  12.53799987,  13.00499988,
        13.57599998,  14.05599999,  14.52399993,  15.00199985,
        15.09299994,  15.57599998,  16.04399991,  16.52199984,
        17.08899999,  17.55799985,  18.03699994,  18.50499988,
        19.0769999 ,  19.5539999 ,  20.023     ,  20.50099993,
        20.59099984,  21.07399988])

In [49]:weight1
Out[49]:
array([ 82.268,  82.268,  82.269,  82.272,  82.275,  82.291,  82.289,
        82.288,  82.287,  82.287,  82.293,  82.303,  82.303,  82.314,
        82.321,  82.333,  82.356,  82.368,  82.386,  82.398,  82.411,
        82.417,  82.419,  82.424,  82.424,  82.437,  82.45 ,  82.472,
        82.498,  82.515,  82.541,  82.559,  82.584,  82.607,  82.617,
        82.626,  82.626,  82.629,  82.63 ,  82.636,  82.651,  82.663,
        82.686,  82.703,  82.728,  82.755,  82.773,  82.8  ,  82.8  ,
        82.826])

In [50]:trailing_diff(time1,weight1,10)
Out[50]:
array([ 0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,
        0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,
        0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,
        0.   ,  0.169,  0.182,  0.181,  0.209,  0.227,  0.254,  0.272,
        0.291,  0.304,  0.303,  0.305,  0.305,  0.296,  0.274,  0.268,
        0.265,  0.265,  0.275,  0.286,  0.309,  0.331,  0.336,  0.35 ,
        0.35 ,  0.354])
share|improve this question
    
Can you show some (small) input and output? –  Ophion Aug 23 '13 at 2:47
    
@Ophion. Embarrasing omission. Fixed. –  Chris Aug 23 '13 at 3:00
    
How big are time_array and data_array? –  tom10 Aug 23 '13 at 4:02
    
ideally 7 digits, if that becomes too much of a burden i might be able to reduce it to 6. –  Chris Aug 23 '13 at 11:08
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a ready-made interpolation routine. If you really want nearest neighbor behavior, I think it will have to be scipy's scipy.interpolate.interp1d, but linear interpolation seems a better option, and then you could use numpy's numpy.interp:

def trailing_diff(time, data, diff):
    ret = np.zeros_like(data)
    mask = (time - time[0]) >= diff
    ret[mask] = data[mask] - np.interp(time[mask] - diff,
                                       time, data)
    return ret

time = np.arange(10) + np.random.rand(10)/2
weight = 82 + np.random.rand(10)

>>> time
array([ 0.05920317,  1.23000929,  2.36399981,  3.14701595,  4.05128494,
        5.22100886,  6.07415922,  7.36161563,  8.37067107,  9.11371986])
>>> weight
array([ 82.14004969,  82.36214992,  82.25663272,  82.33764514,
        82.52985723,  82.67820915,  82.43440796,  82.74038368,
        82.84235675,  82.1333915 ])
>>> trailing_diff(time, weight, 3)
array([ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.18093749,  0.20161107,
        0.4082712 ,  0.10430073,  0.17116831,  0.20691594, -0.31041841])

To get nearest neighbor, you would do

from scipy.interpolate import interp1d

def trailing_diff(time, data, diff):
    ret = np.zeros_like(data)
    mask = (time - time[0]) >= diff
    interpolator = interp1d(time, data, kind='nearest')
    ret[mask] = data[mask] - interpolator(time[mask] - diff)
    return ret
share|improve this answer
    
killed it. the nearest neighbor implementation works flawlessly and brings me down from ~35ms to ~580us. Also, very readable an understandable. Many thanks. –  Chris Aug 23 '13 at 11:24
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