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It is easy to "switch" between 0 and 1 in the following way:

 int i = 0;
 i = (++i) % 2; // i = 1
 i = (++i) % 2; // i = 0

Similarly, I found that it is possible to "switch" between 3 and 5:

 int i = 3;
 i = (((i * 2) - 1) % 3) + 3; // i = 5
 i = (((i * 2) - 1) % 3) + 3; // i = 3

Whereas this feels cumbersome, I am searching for a more concise way to do it. Can it be simplified? If so, how? I am actually using this for something, by the way.

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huh, why can't you do i =3 and i=5, you should really give this code some context –  aaronman Aug 23 '13 at 3:53
5  
You can toggle between 0 and 1 with i = !i; (but not i != i;) and also i = 1 - i;. For toggling between 3 and 5 you can use i = 8 - i;. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 23 '13 at 4:04
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6 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Much shorter:

int i = 3;
i = 8 - i;
i = 8 - i;

And of course, for your 0/1 toggle, you should do this:

int i = 0;
i = 1 - i;
i = 1 - i;

And in general, for an a/b toggle, do this:

int i = a;
i = (a + b) - i;
i = (a + b) - i;

How does that work? Well, a + b - a is b, and a + b - b is a. :-D

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(As long as a+b doesn’t overflow, anyway) –  Stephen Canon Aug 23 '13 at 14:45
    
@Stephen See my comment to roliu (in the post below). –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 23 '13 at 18:06
1  
While I agree that this works out fine on most common systems, platforms that saturate on overflow do exist, which breaks this idiom; it’s worth being aware of that. –  Stephen Canon Aug 23 '13 at 18:21
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Another way is to use XOR, because a ^ (a ^ b) == b and b ^ (a ^ b) == a:

int i = 3;
i ^= 3 ^ 5; // i == 5
i ^= 3 ^ 5; // i == 3
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2  
This is actually nicer than using sum since it won't overflow (or underflow). It's also a standard bit-level trick that is used in tons of other... bit-level tricks. –  roliu Aug 23 '13 at 7:46
1  
@roliu I agree, though in two's-complement systems, usually overflows and underflows don't hurt, even though technically it's considered undefined behaviour. –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 23 '13 at 10:46
    
That's true. I shouldn't mindlessly say overflow/underflow is bad considering adding would work probably 100% of the time here in standard C implementations. But good to know it's also undefined –  roliu Aug 23 '13 at 16:24
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You could say:

i = 3;
i = (i == 5) ? 3 : 5; // it's five now
i = (i == 5) ? 3 : 5; // it's three now
i = (i == 5) ? 3 : 5; // it's five again
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1  
But but but...branching is so slow! >_< –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 23 '13 at 4:01
    
@ChrisJester-Young: Nothing about this solution implies branching. The compiler could choose to use conditional moves, or it could compile this to the same arithmetic as your solution uses, or (more likely) it will simply constant-propagate the whole thing to be equivalent to just i = 5. You can’t meaningfully talk about C language statements as “branching” or being “slow”. –  Stephen Canon Aug 23 '13 at 22:47
    
@StephenCanon I 100% agree. My comment was facetious, though I suppose not everyone will successfully read that. (Serious comment: I don't usually let microoptimisations decide how I write code, unless profiling indicates a need to.) –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 23 '13 at 23:47
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Or, perhaps more generically, use a function to map from sequential integers to any repeating sequence of integers:

#include <stdio.h>

int mapModIntToSequence (int i, int mod, int x[]) {
    return x[i%mod];
}

int main () {
    int i;
    int x[] = {2,7};
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        printf ("%d\n",mapModIntToSequence(i,2,x));
    }
}

This approach has the bonus that it also works for sequences of any length - not just toggling between two integers.

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The objective is to do i = mapModIntToSequence(i, 2, x); so that i contains the new value. Unfortunately, your code doesn't handle that. You code maps a sequence number to an element of the cycle; it doesn't map an element of the cycle to the next element of the cycle. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 23 '13 at 4:36
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Also much shorter:

i = 3;
i ^= 6; // now i = 5
i ^= 6; // now i = 3

To toggle between two numbers a and b, you need the constant value a XOR b -- which is 1 for your first example and 6 in your second.

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i=3;

i = i+2 = 5;
i = i-2 = 3;
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2  
How do you know whether to add or subtract 2 without testing i first? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 23 '13 at 4:30
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