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It would be nice to use for (String item: list), but it will only iterate through one list, and you'd need an explicit iterator for the other list. Or, you could use an explicit iterator for both.

Here's an example of the problem, and a solution using an indexed for loop instead:

import java.util.*;
public class ListsToMap {
  static public void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> names = Arrays.asList("apple,orange,pear".split(","));
    List<String> things = Arrays.asList("123,456,789".split(","));
    Map<String,String> map = new LinkedHashMap<String,String>();  // ordered

    for (int i=0; i<names.size(); i++) {
      map.put(names.get(i), things.get(i));    // is there a clearer way?
    }

    System.out.println(map);
  }
}

Output:

{apple=123, orange=456, pear=789}

Is there a clearer way? Maybe in the collections API somewhere?

share|improve this question
    
Are the lists to make the example general or is your real use-case starting out with String[] arrays? – PSpeed Dec 3 '09 at 13:28
    
@PSpeed my real use-case uses Lists not arrays; and only one is a String. – 13ren Dec 3 '09 at 13:49
    
If the lists might be unequal in length, you may want the number of iterations to only be the length of the shortest list: for(int i = 0; i < (names.size() < things.size() ? names.size() : things.size()); i++) – Robert Grant Dec 3 '09 at 14:35
1  
If your lists are indexed lists (Like ArrayList and that arrays wrapper) then I say stick with indexes. If they are random collections then the iterator approach is better performing on the whole. If you find you do this pattern a lot you could even write a Coiterator wrapper that would return a two-value entry from the two iterators and wrap up the error checking, etc.. – PSpeed Dec 3 '09 at 15:33
1  
Are you absolutely sure you need to do this? It's a pretty awful way to construct a map -- error-prone, and difficult for any reader to make sense of what maps to what. Every time someone I've talked to has thought they needed to do this, they've found a better way. – Kevin Bourrillion Dec 4 '09 at 0:22
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Since the key-value relationship is implicit via the list index, I think the for-loop solution that uses the list index explicitly is actually quite clear - and short as well.

share|improve this answer
    
But to use .get(i) is a bad idea if you combine e.g. LinkedLists - in that case it is not a constant time operation anymore. – hstoerr Jun 27 '12 at 14:50

I'd often use the following idiom. I admit it is debatable whether it is clearer.

Iterator<String> i1 = names.iterator();
Iterator<String> i2 = things.iterator();
while (i1.hasNext() && i2.hasNext()) {
    map.put(i1.next(), i2.next());
}
if (i1.hasNext() || i2.hasNext()) complainAboutSizes();

It has the advantage that it also works for Collections and similar things without random access or without efficient random access, like LinkedList, TreeSets or SQL ResultSets. For example, if you'd use the original algorithm on LinkedLists, you've got a slow Shlemiel the painter algorithm which actually needs n*n operations for lists of length n.

As 13ren pointed out, you can also use the fact that Iterator.next throws a NoSuchElementException if you try to read after the end of one list when the lengths are mismatched. So you'll get the terser but maybe a little confusing variant:

Iterator<String> i1 = names.iterator();
Iterator<String> i2 = things.iterator();
while (i1.hasNext() || i2.hasNext()) map.put(i1.next(), i2.next());
share|improve this answer
1  
This at least works on lists of inequal size without any prechecks. – BalusC Dec 3 '09 at 13:16
1  
@BalusC Which may not actually be what you want. Since index -> index is supposed to match this would break silently on mismatched lists. @hstoerr In the OP's example the iterators would be using index-based random access internally so you haven't really gained anything there. When the index is the semantic relationship between two lists, I'm not sure you can get around using it. – PSpeed Dec 3 '09 at 13:26
1  
@PSpeed OP here, my example code would also silently continue if the second list was longer... I'm not worried about validity-checking, but one way to do it is while(true), and only break when both have none left (if only one has none left, then it will continue, and throw a NoSuchElementException on the next() for that list). – 13ren Dec 3 '09 at 13:57
1  
it's also not hard to add a check after the above code, if needed... if (i1.hasNext() || i2.hasNext()) throw SomeException(... – Carlos Heuberger Dec 3 '09 at 15:29
1  
You could also do that by setting count = Math.max( length1, length2 ). I'm still convinced your current way is best as it says exactly what you are doing: syncing up two lists by index. – PSpeed Dec 3 '09 at 15:30

Your solution above is correct of course, but your as question was about clarity, I'll address that.

The clearest way to combine two lists would be to put the combination into a method with a nice clear name. I've just taken your solution and extracted it to a method here:


  Map<String,String> combineListsIntoOrderedMap (List<String> keys, List<String> values) {
    if (keys.size() != values.size())
      throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Cannot combine lists with dissimilar sizes");
    Map<String,String> map = new LinkedHashMap<String,String>();
    for (int i=0; i<keys.size(); i++) {
      map.put(keys.get(i), values.get(i));
    }
    return map;
  }

And of course, your refactored main would now look like this:


  static public void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> names = Arrays.asList("apple,orange,pear".split(","));
    List<String> things = Arrays.asList("123,456,789".split(","));
    Map<String,String> map = combineListsIntoOrderedMap (names, things);
    System.out.println(map);
  }

I couldn't resist the length check.

share|improve this answer
1  
... and if we put it in a class, we can genericize it over types other than String,String. Perhaps, making it a subclass of LinkedHashMap, and your method as a constructor (since that is what it is always doing). It would be nice to be able to genericize the superclass (so that the particular Map class becomes a parameter), but I'm pretty sure java doesn't allow that. It could be done in a separate class (not extending LinkedHashMap), taking three class parameters. [off the top of my head] – 13ren Dec 3 '09 at 16:50
    
@13ren: yes, very nice. – CPerkins Dec 3 '09 at 19:51
1  
The algorithm is very inefficient on long LinkedLists, since they do not have efficient random access. I think if you are writing a reusable function, you should consider that. – hstoerr Oct 13 '15 at 6:22
    
@hstoerr Good point. I guess I'm in the habit of thinking about ArrayLists. – CPerkins Oct 13 '15 at 13:32

As well as clarity, I think there are other things that are worth considering:

  • Correct rejection of illegal arguments, such as different sizes lists and nulls (look what happens if things is null in the question code).
  • Ability to handle lists that do not have fast random access.
  • Ability to handle concurrent and synchronised collections.

So, for library code, perhaps something like this:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <K,V> Map<K,V> void linkedZip(
    List<? extends K> keys, List<? extends V> values
) {
    Object[] keyArray = keys.toArray();
    Object[] valueArray = values.toArray();
    int len = keyArray.length;
    if (len != valueArray.length) {
        throwLengthMismatch(keyArray, valueArray);
    }
    Map<K,V> map = new java.util.LinkedHashMap<K,V>((int)(len/0.75f)+1);
    for (int i=0; i<len; ++i) {
        map.put((K)keyArray[i], (V)valueArray[i]);
    }
    return map;
}

(May want to check not putting multiple equal keys.)

share|improve this answer
    
The .toArray is because it is an atomic operation on synchronized collection and avoids background modification trouble on concurrent operations? A very good point! – hstoerr Oct 13 '15 at 6:20

ArrayUtils#toMap() doesn't combine two lists into a map, but does do so for a 2 dimensional array (so not quite what your looking for, but maybe of interest for future reference...)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - btw your url missed the "#" stuff: commons.apache.org/lang/api/org/apache/commons/lang/… – 13ren Dec 3 '09 at 13:52

You need not even limit yourself to Strings. Modifying the code from CPerkins a little :

Map<K, V> <K, V> combineListsIntoOrderedMap (List<K> keys, List<V> values) {
      if (keys.size() != values.size())
          throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Cannot combine lists with dissimilar sizes");
Map<K, V> map = new LinkedHashMap<K, V>();
for (int i=0; i<keys.size(); i++) {
  map.put(keys.get(i), values.get(i));
}
return map;

}

share|improve this answer
    
See my comment to CPerkins - I was thinking of also genericizing which Map class it uses? Maybe Map<M extends Map<K, V>, K, V> map = new M<K, V>(); But it seems type erasure makes that impossible, because the type isn't known at runtime: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generics_in_Java#Type_erasure – 13ren Dec 4 '09 at 7:01
    
Whoops, I meant the code to be <M extends Map<K, V>, K, V> ... Map<K, V> map = new M<K, V>(); – 13ren Dec 4 '09 at 7:02

There's no clear way. I still wonder if Apache Commons or Guava has something similar. Anyway I had my own static utility. But this one is aware of key collisions!

public static <K, V> Map<K, V> map(Collection<K> keys, Collection<V> values) {

    Map<K, V> map = new HashMap<K, V>();
    Iterator<K> keyIt = keys.iterator();
    Iterator<V> valueIt = values.iterator();
    while (keyIt.hasNext() && valueIt.hasNext()) {
        K k = keyIt.next();
        if (null != map.put(k, valueIt.next())){
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Keys are not unique! Key " + k + " found more then once.");
        }
    }
    if (keyIt.hasNext() || valueIt.hasNext()) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Keys and values collections have not the same size");
    };

    return map;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice one! I just saw this because of a comment on my solution. I disagree that there's no clear way - this way seems very clear to me. And I like the way it includes the double-iterator solution from @hstoerr with the generics from @fastcodejava. – CPerkins Oct 13 '15 at 20:17

Use Clojure. one line is all it takes ;)

 (zipmap list1 list2)
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I guess that is java, in a way; it amounts to having a function for the task (see CPerkins' answer). The equivalent java call, of zipmap(list1, list2) , is not all that different, if you have the function already. – 13ren Dec 3 '09 at 16:42
1  
Right. But Clojure is such a cool language that I couldn't resist it – GabiMe Dec 3 '09 at 17:02

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