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I have some problems with implementation of Json Deserialization in my Android application (with Gson library)

I've made class like this

public class MyJson<T>{
    public List<T> posts;
}

And Deserialization call is:

public class JsonDownloader<T> extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, MyJson<T>> {
...
protected MyJson<T> doInBackground(Void... params) {
  ...
    Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(content);
    GsonBuilder gson = new GsonBuilder();
    Type collectionType = new TypeToken<MyJson<T>>() {}.getType();
    result = gson.create().fromJson(reader, collectionType);
  ...
  }
}

Problem is that result.posts list after call holds one Array of LinkedTreeMap Objects(with correct values so problem is Deserialization) instead of MyJson Objects. When I use MyObject instead of T everything is running fine and MyObject is correct.

So is there any way to implement deserialization call without creating custom deserializer?

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2  
What do you mean by When I use MyJson instead of MyJson –  John B Aug 23 '13 at 7:38
    
Heh I meant MyJson instead of T sorry –  VizGhar Aug 23 '13 at 9:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Have you tried?

gson.create().fromJson(reader, MyJson.class);

EDIT

After reading this post it seems that you use of Type is correct. I believe your issue is the use of T. You must remember that with Java there is type-erasure. This means that at runtime all instances of T are replaced with Object. Therefore at runtime what you are passing GSON is really MyJson<Object>. If you tried this with a concrete class in place of <T> I believe it would work.

google-gson-deserialize-listclass-object-generic-type

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OK my solution is to send Type as parameter when creating JsonDownloader class, then everything works fine. I didn't know about Type Erasure so thanks for pointing me on it. –  VizGhar Aug 23 '13 at 9:39

You have to specify the type of T at the time of deserialization. How would your List of posts get created if Gson didn't know what Type to instantiate? It can't stay T forever. So, you would provide the type T as a Class parameter.

Now assuming, the type of posts was String you would deserialize MyJson<String> as (I've also added a String json parameter for simplicity; you would read from your reader as before):

doInBackground(String.class, "{posts: [\"article 1\", \"article 2\"]}");

protected MyJson<T> doInBackground(Class<T> type, String json, Void... params) {

    GsonBuilder gson = new GsonBuilder();
    Type collectionType = new TypeToken<MyJson<T>>(){}.getType();

    MyJson<T> myJson = gson.create().fromJson(json, collectionType);

    System.out.println(myJson.getPosts()); // ["article 1", "article 2"]
    return myJson;
}

Similarly, to deserialize a MyJson of Boolean objects

doInBackground(Boolean.class, "{posts: [true, false]}");

protected MyJson<T> doInBackground(Class<T> type, String json, Void... params) {

    GsonBuilder gson = new GsonBuilder();
    Type collectionType = new TypeToken<MyJson<T>>(){}.getType();

    MyJson<T> myJson = gson.create().fromJson(json, collectionType);

    System.out.println(myJson.getPosts()); // [true, false]
    return myJson;
}

I've assumed MyJson<T> for my examples to be as

public class MyJson<T> {

    public List<T> posts;

    public List<T> getPosts() {
        return posts;
    }
}

So, if you were looking for to deserialize a List<MyObject> you would invoke the method as

// assuming no Void parameters were required
MyJson<MyObject> myJson = doInBackground(MyObject.class);
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