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I have a complex grep/awk/etc command line which use some " some $var already, which makes it even impossible to use

VAR="$( that command )" 

to get all output

I don't want to create temp files, which make it even ugly,

is it possible to pass pipe output into a variable in bash

like

command   |   > $VAR
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command > $VAR would create a file named $VAR. –  devnull Aug 23 '13 at 8:22
    
Have you tried to escape the " and $ characters inside the VAR="$(..."? Example: VAR="$(echo \")" ; echo $VAR –  StianE Aug 23 '13 at 8:22
    
are you sure you can't use : VAR="$( that command )"? Notice that inside $(...), you "go" into that level, which means you don't have to escape quotes. Ex: you can write VAR="$(echo "toto titi")" instead of VAR="$(echo \"toto titi\")". Using the first form ( VAR="$(echo "toto titi")" ) You'll end up (after bash evaluate first the $(...) part) with VAR="toto titi", as needed. –  Olivier Dulac Aug 23 '13 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just use the : VAR=$(complex command ), writing complex command exactly as you would if you were writing it on the next line.

Ex: if you have

foo=1
bar="2 3"
awk -v myfoo="$foo" -v mybar="$bar" '..... complex 
                                          awk 
                                          script here .....'

you could put that into VAR with:

foo=1
bar="2 3"
VAR="$( awk -v myfoo="$foo" -v mybar="$bar" '..... complex 
                                                   awk 
                                                   script here .....' )"

ie, once inside $(...), bash is reading things as if it was at the "first level". It works as $(...) is evaluated first before the line containing it is evaluated.

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it works. thanks –  valpa Aug 26 '13 at 2:01

You can do a for loop as following (Just a warning, for loop split output by space. So you'll got a word by iteration):

    #!/usr/bin/ksh

    for RC_OUTPUT in $(./testEcho.ksh)
    do
        echo $RC_OUTPUT
    done

Here a more complex solution (max line lenght = 80): #!/usr/bin/ksh

    LINE_LENGTH_MAX=80
    LINE_LENGTH=0

    for RC_OUTPUT in $(./testEcho.ksh)
    do
        CURRENT_LENGTH="$(expr length $RC_OUTPUT)" 
        (( LINE_LENGTH = LINE_LENGTH + CURRENT_LENGTH + 1 ))
        if [[ $LINE_LENGTH -gt $LINE_LENGTH_MAX ]]
        then
            LINE_LENGTH=$CURRENT_LENGTH
            echo $RC_OUTPUT
        else
            echo -n "$RC_OUTPUT "
        fi
    done
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