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I. Problem description:

Class Derived is a child of class Base. You can not modify class Base. Define constructors and assignement operators for Derived so that it could be constructed both from instances of:

  • Base1

  • Derived1

  • N non-polymorphic and not related types Foo1, ... , FooN2.

1 Construction from both Base and Derived is done using Base copy constructor.

2 Construction from all of Foo1, ... , FooN is done by a generic algorithm.

II. Possible solutions:

1. Brute force:

N+1 separate constructors + N+1 separate assignment operators. Absolutely not elegant. Tons of useless code: N+1 methods declarations in header + N+1 methods implementations in source. Power of templates not used.

2. Template constructor with type restriction

Declare and define regular copy-constructor

Derived::Derived ( const Base& object_reference ) { ... }

Declare template constructor:

template<typename type>
Derived::Derived ( const type& object_reference );

Implement for each of Foo0, ... , FooN

template<>
Derived::Derived<Foo0> ( const Foo0& object_reference ) { ... }

...

template<>
Derived::Derived<Foo9> ( const Foo9& object_reference ) { ... }

As a result the header will contain only two constructors and only two assignment operators. But we will have to implement N+1 methods in the source. I believe there is a better solution anyway.

III. What will not work:

1. Separating `Base` and `Derived` from others using `dynamic_cast`

template<typename type>
Derived::Derived ( const type& object_reference )
{

    //  This line will not compile since `Foo0`, ... , `FooN` are non-polymorthic
    Base* base_ptr = dynamic_cast <Base*> (&object_reference);

    if ( base_ptr != nullptr )
    {

        //  Construct from `Base`
        return;

    }

    //  Construct from `Foo0`, ... , `FooN`

}

2. Separating `Base` and `Derived` from others using `typeid`

template<typename type>
Derived::Derived ( const type& object_reference )
{

    if
    (
        typeid(typename) == typeid(Foo0)
            ||
            ...
            ||
        typeid(typename) == typeid(FooN)
    }
    {

        //  Construct from `Foo0`, ... , `FooN`
        return;

    }

    else
    {

        //  Construct from `Base`

        //  Here we should call `Base` members which `Foo0`, ... , `FooN` don't have
        //  so the following line will not compile
        //  object_reference.some_method();
        //  And we need to cast "&object_reference" to "Base*" what is not possible
        //  because `Foo0`, ... , `FooN` are not polimorthic

    }

}

IV. The question:

Is there any efficient way, which is not described in section II, to solve the problem?

share|improve this question
1  
Do Foo0..FooN have something in common? –  Rapptz Aug 23 '13 at 8:30
    
@Rapptz One generic algorithm constructs from any of them. –  Petr Budnik Aug 23 '13 at 8:31
4  
I think critical information is missing here, namely what the construction from Foo0..FooN would do. If every type leads to an own action that cannot be generalized, there is no point in using templates. Actually, what you call brute force would be the correct solution, because it defines exactly with which types the constructor will work. Templates only make sense if the construction can be generalized for all or some of Foo0..FooN. –  flyx Aug 23 '13 at 8:45
1  
@Kolyunya: Why do you need to specialize the template constructor in II.2 then? –  flyx Aug 23 '13 at 8:50
1  
@Kolyunya 2. Separating Base and Derived from others using typeid why do you need typeid? Make two ctors from Base and Derived (non-template) and make template one for Foo classes. –  ruslo Aug 23 '13 at 9:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need to use typeid here:

2. Separating `Base` and `Derived` from others using `typeid`

Just make two non-template ctors and one template ctor for Foo classes:

class Derived : public Base {
 public:
  Derived(const Derived&);
  Derived(const Base&);

  template<class Foo>
  Derived(const Foo&);
};
share|improve this answer
    
If there is a chance to do construction from Foo 1 to Foo n within one template there seems to be no reason to not separate the things in foo base and foo derived ( 0 .. n ). If this answer is the correct solution, I could not really understand the question from op. –  Klaus Aug 23 '13 at 11:08
    
@Klaus No, the problem is in mixing Derived/Base classes with Foo classes in templates, if Derived/Base classed don't have some functions which is used to construct Foo classes (but all Foo classes have this functions), you need to provide stubs with runtime error check, otherwise you'll got compilation error during template instantiation. –  ruslo Aug 23 '13 at 11:57

From the information in your comments, there actually is a commonality between Foo1 and FooN, namely they are all encodings of a socket address. So make a to_string() serialization in the various FooAny classes,

class FooAny // Any runs from 1 to N
{
public:
    std::string to_string() const { /* FooAny specific */ }
private:
    // bla
};

and then use a single template constructor in Derived that delegate to a regular construtor taking a std::string argument

class Derived
{
    explicit Derived(std::string const& s): /* convert data members from string */ {}

    template<class Foo>
    explicit Derived(Foo const& f): Derived(f.to_string()) {} // delegating constructor
};
share|improve this answer
    
Alternative one could implement it using a to_string trait, and you wouldn't have to add this member, if you didn't like to. –  Skeen Aug 23 '13 at 8:58

Here is my two cents. (Code on Ideone.com)

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

namespace so
{
struct _base_ {};

struct _foo1_{};
struct _foo2_{};
struct _foo3_{};

class _derived_: public _base_
{
 public:
  _derived_() = default;

  _derived_(_derived_ const & _obj)
      : _base_(_obj)
  {
   std::cout << "Constructed from _derived_" << std::endl;
  }

  _derived_(_base_ const & _obj)
      : _base_(_obj)
  {
   std::cout << "Constructed from _base_" << std::endl;
  }

  template <typename _t_, typename = typename std::enable_if<
     std::is_same<_t_, _foo1_>::value || std::is_same<_t_, _foo2_>::value || 
     std::is_same<_t_, _foo3_>::value>::type>
  _derived_(_t_ const &)
      : _base_()
  {
   std::cout << "Constructed from _fooN_ using generic algorithm" << std::endl;
  }

  ~_derived_() noexcept (true) = default;
};
} //namespace so


int main()
{
 so::_base_ b_{};
 so::_derived_ d_{};
 so::_foo1_ f1_{};
 so::_foo2_ f2_{};
 so::_foo3_ f3_{};

 so::_derived_ db_{b_};
 so::_derived_ dd_{d_};
 so::_derived_ df1_{f1_};
 so::_derived_ df2_{f2_};
 so::_derived_ df3_{f3_};

 return (0);
}
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