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I would like to know if there is an efficient algorithm S = F(v,G) to construct a subgraph S out of a DAG G = (V,E) such that all the paths in S contain the vertex v of V. If so, it is possible to efficiently extend F to F'(N,G) for a set of vertices N. I am open to any data structures for storing the DAG G initially.

Actually a condition I forgot to add would be that G has a unique vertex r with no incoming edge and a path must be of the form where d is a vertex with no outgoing edge.

Another condition I have missed is given the extended F'(N,G) such that for all v,w of N if < r,..,v,..,w > where w is a sink, then we should disregard for paths < r,..,v,..,x > where x != w.

I actually have one solution but it does not scale, when #V > 2000 and #N > 2.

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Could this be homework? –  Sebastian Dec 3 '09 at 13:22
    
If this is homework, please tag it as such. –  Björn Pollex Dec 3 '09 at 13:23
    
this is not homework. –  Peter Dec 3 '09 at 13:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assume that you are looking for the largest subgraph S of G = ( {r} + V + {d}, E ) where r is the unique source node and d is the sink such that every path from r to d passes a specific node v.

My proposed algorithm:

  1. Find all paths between r and v using e.g. the answers provided in http://stackoverflow.com/questions/713508/find-the-paths-between-two-given-nodes

  2. Find all paths between v and using the same algorithm. Since G is acyclic, no path from v to d can lead back to a path already found in step 1. Thus, in the resulting graph all paths between r and d will pass v.

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S could be G itself if there is a path going from every vertex in G to v (remember G is a DAG). Actually a condition I forgot to add would be that G has a unique vertex r with no incoming edge and a path must be of the form <r,...v,...d> where d is a vertex with no outgoing edge. –  Peter Dec 3 '09 at 13:43
    
A trivial solution still exists, even with the condition above. Any path of the form <r, ...., v, ..., d> satisfies the conditions for the subgraph. –  Rafał Dowgird Dec 3 '09 at 15:28
    
Thank you. It should indeed be the largest subgraph satisfying the condition. Unfortunately your solution does not scale well (it's indeed very similar to my original solution.) when we consider more than one such v. Another condition I have missed also it given the extended F'(N,G) such that for all v,w of N if <r,..,v,..,w> where w is a sink, then we should disregard for paths <r,..,v,..,x> where x != w. –  Peter Dec 4 '09 at 9:49
    
I think this should scale well if you do breadth-first search to find all nodes from r to N and from d to N along edges in inverse direction. Doing BFS starting in r you will reach all reachable N anyway, you only have to store the paths you took. –  Sebastian Dec 4 '09 at 9:57

Resultant graph contains nodes that are reachable from v and the nodes v is reachable from (or, nodes that are reachable from v in a transposed subgraph). Getting the set of reachable nodes can be done efficiently.

This may be extended easily for a set of nodes: you should just add them all at the beginning of your breadth-first search.

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