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I'm trying to configure a UIPageViewController SPECIFICALLY from storyboard:

enter image description here

TutorialPageViewController.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
@interface TutorialPageViewController : UIPageViewController <UIPageViewControllerDelegate, UIPageViewControllerDataSource>
@end

TutorialPageViewController.m

#import "TutorialPageViewController.h"

@interface TutorialPageViewController ()
@property (assign, nonatomic) NSInteger index;
@end

@implementation TutorialPageViewController
{
    NSArray *myViewControllers;
}

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Custom initialization
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view.
    self.delegate = self;
    self.dataSource = self;
    [self didMoveToParentViewController:self];
    UIStoryboard *tutorialStoryboard = [UIStoryboard storyboardWithName:@"TutorialStoryboard" bundle:[NSBundle mainBundle]];
    UIViewController *tuto1 = [tutorialStoryboard instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"TutorialPageViewController_1"];
    UIViewController *tuto2 = [tutorialStoryboard instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"TutorialPageViewController_2"];

    myViewControllers = @[tuto1, tuto2, tuto1, tuto2];
    self.index = 0;

    [self setViewControllers:@[tuto1] direction:UIPageViewControllerNavigationDirectionForward animated:NO completion:nil];
}

- (UIViewController *)viewControllerAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index {
    return myViewControllers[index];
}

- (UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController {

    NSUInteger index = self.index;

    if (index == 0) { return nil; }

    // Decrease the index by 1 to return
    index--;
    return [self viewControllerAtIndex:index];
}

- (UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController {

    NSUInteger index = self.index;
    index++;
    if (index > [myViewControllers count]) { return nil; }

    return [self viewControllerAtIndex:index];
}

- (NSInteger)presentationCountForPageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController {
    // The number of items reflected in the page indicator.
    return [myViewControllers count];
}

- (NSInteger)presentationIndexForPageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController {
    // The selected item reflected in the page indicator.
    return 0;
}

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
    // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
}

@end

Problem is...

  • The first page displays well with the page indicator. While swiping,
  • I can see properly the second page.
  • As soon as the transition finishes, I get a black screen (with the page indicator properly displaying page number 2). No user interaction is available anymore.
share|improve this question
    
This is the first time I've seen the UIPageViewController itself used for it's own datasource and delegate. Seems logical but every tutorial I've seen doesn't go this route. Hopefully you go tit working. –  Travis M. Aug 7 at 20:00
    
@BenjaminToueg, I'm pretty sure "didMoveToParentViewController" is unnecessary here. –  Joe Blow Sep 24 at 19:10

3 Answers 3

For someone, who wants to see working page scroll (forward / backward)

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
     viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
  {
     NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];
     // get the index of the current view controller on display

     if (currentIndex > 0)
     {
        return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex-1];
        // return the previous viewcontroller
     } else
     {
         return nil;
         // do nothing
     }
  }
-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
 viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
  {
     NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];
     // get the index of the current view controller on display
     // check if we are at the end and decide if we need to present
     // the next viewcontroller
     if (currentIndex < [myViewControllers count]-1)
     {
        return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex+1];
        // return the next view controller
     } else
     {
        return nil;
        // do nothing
     }
  }

Just to add to this great answer by EditOR, here's what you do if you prefer "round and around" paging: still using the same technique of EditOR

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
        viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
    {
    NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];

    --currentIndex;
    currentIndex = currentIndex % (myViewControllers.count);
    return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex];
    }

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
        viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
    {
    NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];

    ++currentIndex;
    currentIndex = currentIndex % (myViewControllers.count);
    return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex];
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
It works perfectly, EditOR ! –  Joe Blow Sep 24 at 18:46
    
sent a small bounty @EditOR for this great A thanks –  Joe Blow Sep 29 at 6:45

Thanks to this fantastic QA, it's incredibly easy to do scrolling pages (like the typical intro pages in apps), ACTUALLY USING STORYBOARD:

enter image description here

The UIPageViewController is "IntroPages" and it is the blue highlighted one.

Note that the UIPageViewController is in a container view, so it has the shape you want, this is the usual situation. (You might have some buttons down the bottom, for example, below the swiping intro screens). (Note, to put a UIPageViewController in container view, how-to scroll to "Aside"... which explains it.)

Set the IDs of the four Storyboards

enter image description here

(I always put "ID" on the end of storyboard IDs. So here just "1ID" "2ID" or whatever you wish.)

Then thanks to Benjamin and EditOR, here's the total complete code for IntroPages:

I simplified many things. Nothing needs to be customised. Literally just paste in the "ID"s of your intro pages from the storyboard. Have as many or as few intro pages as you want. This si really amazing thanks to the two guys above.

IntroPages.h
@interface IntroPages : UIPageViewController
  <UIPageViewControllerDelegate, UIPageViewControllerDataSource>
@end

IntroPages.m
@implementation IntroPages
{
NSArray *myViewControllers;
}

-(void)viewDidLoad
    {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.delegate = self;
    self.dataSource = self;

    UIViewController *p1 = [self.storyboard
        instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"Intro1ID"];
    UIViewController *p2 = [self.storyboard
        instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"Intro2ID"];
    UIViewController *p3 = [self.storyboard
        instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"Intro3ID"];
    UIViewController *p4 = [self.storyboard
        instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"Intro4ID"];

    myViewControllers = @[p1,p2,p3,p4];

    [self setViewControllers:@[p1]
        direction:UIPageViewControllerNavigationDirectionForward
        animated:NO completion:nil];

    NSLog(@"loaded!");
    }

-(UIViewController *)viewControllerAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index
    {
    return myViewControllers[index];
    }

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
        viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
    {
    NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];

    --currentIndex;
    currentIndex = currentIndex % (myViewControllers.count);
    return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex];
    }

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
        viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
    {
    NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];

    ++currentIndex;
    currentIndex = currentIndex % (myViewControllers.count);
    return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex];
    } 

-(NSInteger)presentationCountForPageViewController:
       (UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
    {
    return myViewControllers.count;
    }

-(NSInteger)presentationIndexForPageViewController:
       (UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
    {
    return 0;
    }

@end
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you're improperly reusing UIViewController instances:

myViewControllers = @[tuto1, tuto2, tuto1, tuto2];

I would suggest you to have an NSMutableSet that would serve as a pool of reusable UIViewController instances.

In viewControllerBeforeViewController: and viewControllerBeforeViewController: search your NSMutableSet using NSPredicate to find a UIViewController with parentViewController equal to nil. If you find one, return it. If not, instantiate a new one, add it to the NSMutableSet and then return it.

When you're done and your tests are passing, you can extract the pool into its own class.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not seem to be correct, Rudolf. It works perfectly just with an ordinary array. No problem at all. All four VCs are just "there" - it's no problem. –  Joe Blow Sep 24 at 18:49
    
@JoeBlow Yeah, array or set, it's up to you. The important thing is the algorithm, especially fact that UIPageViewController becomes the parentViewController. Based on that, you can filter the array/set and find an unused instance of UIViewController. –  Rudolf Adamkovic Sep 25 at 3:40

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