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I've written a wrapper class for C# Stream because I want it to be able to inject data to the stream and call a function whenever data is read via ReadAsync(). However the "inject" part does not work and I have no idea why.

class ExtendedStream : Stream
{
    private readonly Stream _originalStream;
    private readonly Action<byte[]> _readCallback;

    private ManualResetEvent dataInjected = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private List<byte> data = new List<byte>();
    private int pos = 0;

    public ExtendedStream(Stream originalStream, Action<byte[]> readCallback)
    {
        _originalStream = originalStream;
        _readCallback = readCallback;
    }

    public override async Task<int> ReadAsync(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count, System.Threading.CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var read = await _originalStream.ReadAsync(buffer, offset, count, cancellationToken);

        _readCallback(buffer);

        return read;
    }

    public void Inject(string text)
    {
        data.AddRange(new UTF8Encoding(false).GetBytes(text));
        dataInjected.Set();
    }

    private IEnumerable<byte> GetBytes(int count)
    {
        int returned = 0;

        while (returned == 0)
        {
            if (pos < data.Count)
            {
                while (pos < data.Count && returned < count)
                {
                    yield return data[pos];

                    pos += 1; returned += 1;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                dataInjected.Reset();
                dataInjected.WaitOne();
            }
        }
    }       

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        var bytes = GetBytes(count).ToArray();

        for (int i = 0; offset + i < buffer.Length && i < bytes.Length; i++)
        {
            buffer[offset + i] = bytes[i];
        }

        return bytes.Length;
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        _originalStream.Write(buffer, offset, count);
    }

    public override bool CanRead
    {
        get { return _originalStream.CanRead; }
    }

    public override bool CanSeek
    {
        get { return _originalStream.CanSeek; }
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return _originalStream.CanWrite; }
    }

    public override void Flush() 
    {
        _originalStream.Flush();
    }

    public override long Length
    {
        get { return _originalStream.Length; }
    }

    public override long Position
    {
        get { return _originalStream.Position; }
        set { _originalStream.Position = value; }
    }

    public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
    {
        return _originalStream.Seek(offset, origin);
    }

    public override void SetLength(long value)
    {
        _originalStream.SetLength(value);
    }        
}

Then I am reading the stream with XmlReader like follows.

using (XmlReader xmlReader = XmlReader.Create(_extendedStream, new XmlReaderSettings() { Async = true }))
{
                while (await xmlReader.ReadAsync())
                {                        
                    switch (xmlReader.NodeType)
                    {                            
                        case XmlNodeType.EndElement:
                            if (xmlReader.LocalName.Equals("test"))
                            {
                                _log.Debug("</test> injected!");                            
                            }
                            break;
                        default:                              
                            break;
                    }
}

The data is never injected if I call _extendedStream.Inject("</test>"). Does anyone know why?

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1  
Your ReadAsync method delegates to _originalStream.ReadAsync, so I don't think your overridden Read method (where the injection magic happens) ever gets invoked in your sample code. Have you tried stepping through with a debugger? –  Steve Ruble Aug 23 '13 at 10:53
    
Mhm... yes I did go through the code with the debugger. I was of the opinion (don't ask me why) that ReadAsync uses Read like suggested in the example at stackoverflow.com/questions/12015279/…. How do I override ReadAsync (an example would be super)? –  Tony Stark Aug 23 '13 at 11:05

1 Answer 1

Your ReadAsync method delegates to _originalStream.ReadAsync, so I don't think your overridden Read method (where the injection magic happens) ever gets invoked in your sample code.

Rather than overriding ReadAsync (which could get complicated), you could move the read of the original stream into your Read method, which will be invoked asynchronously by the base ReadAsync method.

// UNTESTED CODE, MAY CONTAIN OFF BY ONE ERRORS
public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
{
    int totalBytesRead = 0;
    var bytes = GetBytes(count).ToArray();

    // write injected bytes into buffer
    for (int i = 0; offset + i < buffer.Length && i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        buffer[offset + i] = bytes[i];
    }

    if(bytes.Length < count)
    {
        // we reached the end of the custom bytes, so read the rest from the original stream
        count = count - bytes.Length;
        offset += bytes.Length;
        totalBytesRead = _originalStream.Read(buffer, offset, count);
    }

    totalBytesRead += bytes.Length;

    _readCallback(buffer);

    return totalBytesRead;
}

That may need some tweaking to prevent your injected data from being injected over and over again, but at least the injection logic will be running.

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