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Is there a way to find out via the elasticsearch API how a query string query is actually parsed? You can do that manually by looking at the lucene query syntax, but it would be really nice if you could look at some representation of the actual results the parser has.

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1  
Have you tried enabling the explain output by adding explain=true to your search request? – javanna Aug 23 '13 at 11:06
1  
@javanna Since purpose of explain=true is just to explain the rating of each individual result, that helps a little to guess what's happening. But I'd prefer something explicit, especially for complex cases. – hstoerr Aug 26 '13 at 9:48
1  
Right, have a look at the validate query api then, and use explain there too, should be better. – javanna Aug 26 '13 at 17:36
    
@javanna Good idea, but unfortunately validate's explanation just repeats the query. – hstoerr Aug 27 '13 at 7:19

As javanna mentioned in comments there's _validate api. Here's what works on my local elastic (version 1.6):

curl -XGET 'http://localhost:9201/pl/_validate/query?explain&pretty' -d'
{
  "query": {
      "query_string": {
      "query": "a OR (b AND c) OR (d AND NOT(e or f))",
      "default_field": "t"
    }
  }
}
'

pl is name of index on my cluster. Different index could have different analyzers, that's why query validation is executed in a scope of an index.

The result of the above curl is following:

{
  "valid" : true,
  "_shards" : {
    "total" : 1,
    "successful" : 1,
    "failed" : 0
  },
  "explanations" : [ {
    "index" : "pl",
    "valid" : true,
    "explanation" : "filtered(t:a (+t:b +t:c) (+t:d -(t:e t:or t:f)))->cache(org.elasticsearch.index.search.nested.NonNestedDocsFilter@ce2d82f1)"
  } ]
}

I made one OR lowercase on purpose and as you can see in explanation, it is interpreted as a token and not as a operator.

As for interpretation of the explanation. Format is similar to +- operators of query string query:

  • ( and ) characters start and end bool query
  • + prefix means clause that will be in must
  • - prefix means clause that will be in must_not
  • no prefix means that it will be in should (with default_operator equal to OR)

So above will be equivalent to following:

{
  "bool" : {
    "should" : [
      {
        "term" : { "t" : "a" }
      },
      {
        "bool": {
          "must": [
            {
              "term" : { "t" : "b" }
            },
            {
              "term" : { "t" : "c" }
            }
          ]
        }
      },
      {
        "bool": {
          "must": {
              "term" : { "t" : "d" }
          },
          "must_not": {
            "bool": {
              "should": [
                {
                  "term" : { "t" : "e" }
                },
                {
                  "term" : { "t" : "or" }
                },
                {
                  "term" : { "t" : "f" }
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        }
      }
    ]
  }
}

I used _validate api quite heavily to debug complex filtered queries with many conditions. It is especially useful if you want to check how analyzer tokenized input like an url or if some filter is cached.

There's also an awesome parameter rewrite that I was not aware of until now, which causes the explanation to be even more detailed showing the actual Lucene query that will be executed.

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