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Is it possible in PostgreSQL to filter rows in way that it would show one table rows that are related with other tables empty rows in some time interval.

In other words imagine this example:

There are two tables partners and calls.

create table partners(
    id int,
    name varchar(100),
    call_id references calls (id),
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

create table calls(
    id int,
    name varchar(100),
    date timestamp,
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
);

So imagine this now. There are some rows created in partners table. Some calls made and rows appeared in calls (where date is registered when calls were made). But I need to filter the opposite. How to see partners that has no calls let say in dates between 2013-05-01 and 2013-06-01?

What I don't get it is how to filter partners with non existent records in any period (if period wouldn't be required, then it would be easy. I could just filter partners which have no calls)? Do I need to use external time or something?

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1  
There is not data type called datetime in Postgres. You mean timestamp? –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 23 '13 at 11:41
    
@ErwinBrandstetter Sorry I changed to timestamp now. Used datetime as in openerp, forgot that postgres had different name for it. –  Andrius Aug 23 '13 at 12:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

something like:

select p.*
from partners p
where not exists (select 1 
                  from calls c
                  where c.name = p.name 
                    and c.date between DATE '2013-05-01' and DATE '2013-06-01');
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So PostgreSQL would still check c.date field even if there is nothing there if you use not exists? –  Andrius Aug 23 '13 at 11:25
    
@Andrius: yes of course (any DBMS will do that). –  a_horse_with_no_name Aug 23 '13 at 11:38

you schema looks strange to me. Why partner have a refernece to call? I'd say it should be like this:

create table partners(
    id int,
    name varchar(100),
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

create table calls(
    id int,
    date datetime,
    partner_id references partners (id),
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
);

and your query would be like

select p.*
from partners as p
where
    not exists
    (
        select *
        from calls as c
        where c.partner_id = p.id and c.date between '2013-05-01' and '2013-06-01'
    )

If you want to keep your current schema, then your query could take all distinct partner names and then exclude those who has calls in given period of time:

select distinct p.name
from partners as p
except
select distinct p.name
from partners as p
    inner join calls as c on c.id = p.call_id
where c.date between '2013-05-01' and '2013-06-01'

If there's no link between partners and calls, and you just want to exclude names from calls table (I said, the schema is really strange :)

select distinct p.name
from partners as p
except
select distinct c.name
from calls as c
where c.date between '2013-05-01' and '2013-06-01'
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Actually schema is not really relevant, I just needed to know how to filter one table that is related with another table and with that other tables rows being non existent in some time interval. –  Andrius Aug 23 '13 at 11:29
    
@Andrius, then I'd say not exists is what you want to do. –  Roman Pekar Aug 23 '13 at 11:32

You have a very arcane data structure. A table called partners should have one row per partners. What you are calling partners should really be another table.

So, the first thing to do is get the list of partners. Then use left outer join to connect to the other tables. If there is no match, then keep the rows:

select p.*
from (select distinct name
      from partners
     ) as allpartners left outer join
     p
     on p.name = allpartners.name left outer join
     calls c
     on p.call_id = c.id and
        c.date between DATE1 and DATE2
where c.name is NULL;
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