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I use the following script to kill process by timeout:

# $1 - name of program and its command line

#launch program and remember PID
eval "$1" &
PID=$!

echo "Program '"$1"' started, PID="$PID

i=1
while [ $i -le 300 ]
do
 ps -p $PID >> /dev/null
 if [ $? -ne 0 ]
  then
   wait $PID
   exit $? #success, return rc of program
  fi

 i=$(($i+1))
 echo "waiting 1 second..."
 sleep 1
done

#program does not want to exit itself, kill it
echo "killing program..."
kill $PID
exit 1 #failed

So far, it have worked excellent, but today, i've noticed a bunch of 'hanging' processes in htop, so i've checked out and it turns out, that $PID in this case is not ID of the program process but of the script itself, and all the times i checked, ID of the program is $PID+1. Now, the question is, am i correct to assume, that it will always be $PID+1 and i won't kill something important by replacing kill $PID with something like kill $PID $($PID+1)

EDIT: $1 may have several urguments, like ./bzip2 -ds sample3.bz2 -k

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No, the PID can be anything. It depends on what runs on the system. –  choroba Aug 23 '13 at 11:22
    
You can use pidof <progname> which returns the pid of the process. In this case would be pidof $1. –  Sakthi Kumar Aug 23 '13 at 11:25
    
@SakthiKumar that might be exacly what i need, thank you, i'll test it and reply soon –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 11:27
    
possible duplicate of Timeout a command in bash without unnecessary delay –  dogbane Aug 23 '13 at 11:56
3  
possible duplicate of Inside a bash script, how to get PID from a program executed when using the eval command?. I.e., Try eval "$1 &" instead of eval "$1" &. –  lurker Aug 23 '13 at 12:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can solve the problem simply with the following change:

From:

eval "$1" &

To:

eval "$1 &"

The reason is explained in this answer.

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I just started writing a script with this functionality. I was going to call it "timeout" but before I opened a blank file, I checked to see if there was already a command with the same name. There was...

timeout

edit

If you need "1" specifically as a return value on failure...

timeout 1 nano -w; `if [[ $? == 124 ]] ; then exit 1 ; fi ; exit $?`
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1  
i knew about this command, but fom man If the command times out, then exit with status 124 does not fit. There are a ton of legacy scripts, where "1" is expected as return code from hanging programs, so i'm tied up here –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 12:20
    
@Shf If the command hasn't finished yet, it won't have an output. What do you want instead? –  jozxyqk Aug 23 '13 at 12:24
    
timeout will return 124 after timeout kill, yet in a huge bunch of scripts 1 is expected as return in this case –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 12:29
    
Thanks for nice replies, but for me eval "$1 &" fixed problems –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 12:38

What's wrong with plain

( eval "$1" ) &
sleep 300
kill %1
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I need to have return code of process and not wait 300 seconds if it finishes beforehand, since this script launches a lot of times –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 11:42
    
(sleep 300; kill $PID ) & wait $PID –  chepner Aug 23 '13 at 12:26
    
Thanks for nice replies, but for me eval "$1 &" fixed problems –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 12:38

You are backgrounding eval, not the command it runs, and eval is a shell built-in, so you are forking a new shell; that's why (I think) $! is the PID of the current shell.

One simple solution is to avoid using eval (for this and the usual concerns over security).

$1 "$@" &
PID=$!

True, this doesn't allow you to pass an arbitrary bash command line (pipeline, && list, etc) to your script, but your use case may not need to support such generalization. What commands do you typically pass?

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eval is needed, becouse of < and > are frequent used, like ./cc_dry2 < dhryinput > results , without eval bash is confused –  Shf Aug 23 '13 at 12:28

Also, here is some refactoring to your code, maybe you will learn something from it:

#launch program and remember PID
eval "$1" &
PID=$!

echo "Program '$1' started, PID=$PID" # you can safely use single quotes inside double quotes, your variables are going to work in  " " as well!

i=1
while (( i <= 300 )) # use (( )) for math operations!
do
    ps -p "$PID" >> /dev/null # it is a good rule to quote every variable, even if you're pretty sure that it doesn't contain spaces
    if [[ $? != 0 ]]; then # Try to use [[ ]] instead of [. It is modern bash syntax
        wait "$PID"
        exit "$?" #success, return rc of program
    fi
    ((i++))
    echo "waiting 1 second..."
    sleep 1
done

#program does not want to exit itself, kill it
echo "killing program..."
kill "$PID"
exit 1 #failed
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