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I'm using ThreadLocal variables (through Clojure's vars, but the following is the same for plain ThreadLocals in Java) and very often run into the issue that I can't be sure that a certain code path will be taken on the same thread or on another thread. For code under my control this is obviously not too big a problem, but for polymorphic third party code there's sometimes not even a way to statically determine whether it's safe to assume single threaded execution.

I tend to think this is a inherent issue with ThreadLocals, but I'd like to hear some advise on how to use them in a safe way.

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Where is your code and specific question? –  Thomas Owens Dec 3 '09 at 14:32
    
Feel free to mark my question for community wiki if your bureaucratic instincts tell you that it is. –  pmf Dec 3 '09 at 14:46
    
I don't understand the question, ThreadLocal s are to be used with multithreaded code. If you can assume single threaded execution use local variables... –  pgras Dec 3 '09 at 15:22
    
I don't understand the question either. –  irreputable Dec 3 '09 at 19:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Then don't use ThreadLocals! They are specifically for when you want a variable that's associated with a Thread, as if there were a Map<Thread,T>.

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The answer is so simple! I’d +1 you but unfortunately I’m all out of votes for today. –  Bombe Dec 3 '09 at 14:37

The typical use case (as far as I know) for a ThreadLocal is in a web application framework. An HTTP filter obtains a database connection on an incoming request, and stores the connection in a static ThreadLocal. All subsequent controllers needing the connection can easily obtain it from the framework using a static call. When the response is returned, the same filter releases the connection again.

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