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I have this:

void foo()
{
    int i = /*something*/
    int j = -i;

    if ((i >= 0) || (j >= 0))
        return;

    std::cout << "Worked";
}

First of all, I've tried to assign an std::numeric_limits<int>::quiet_NaN, but it returns a zero. Here I found that integer values can't be NaN (and it means that ints always passes if(i!=i){...} test). So my question is: is it possible to assign something to i variable in foo() to perform an output?

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2  
Your question has nothing to do with your code. Do you understand the difference between "and" and "or"? –  Kerrek SB Aug 23 '13 at 11:57
8  
Non-negative and non-positive? You mean like 0? –  juanchopanza Aug 23 '13 at 11:57
3  
Your title is misleading. It doesn't include 0 like your code does. –  chris Aug 23 '13 at 11:58
    
If this isn't just a shadow of the real problem, there's always boost::optional. –  chris Aug 23 '13 at 12:00
1  
@KerrekSB yes, I can understand this difference. But I tried to solve the problem as it was effected. I found this problem at last year's programming contest. –  Netherwire Aug 23 '13 at 12:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This outputs "Worked" for me. It's formaly undefined, though.

#include <climits>

void foo()
{
    int i = INT_MIN;
    int j = -i;

    if ((i >= 0) || (j >= 0))
        return;

    std::cout << "Worked";
}

int main() { foo(); }

Use at your own peril.

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4  
-INT_MIN leads to signed integer overflow on 2's complement systems, which is undefined behavior. –  user529758 Aug 23 '13 at 12:00
1  
I have to admit this is pretty clever, even for it being UB (which you did point out). –  chris Aug 23 '13 at 12:01
2  
@H2CO3, yeah that's what I said. –  jrok Aug 23 '13 at 12:01
1  
@jrok thanks, it works great. Both i and j becomes INT_MIN, and it seems like I know the reason why. –  Netherwire Aug 23 '13 at 12:09
    
@RomanChehowsky No problem. I added a little disclaimer :) –  jrok Aug 23 '13 at 12:13

Assuming your original title was correct

Yes i == 0 is both non-negative and non-positive. But in order to get the output "Worked", you need to change your if() predicate to only return if either i or j are negative

#include <iostream>

void foo()
{
    int i = 0;
    int j = -i;

    if ((i >= 0) || !(j >= 0))
        return;

    std::cout << "Worked";
}

int main()
{
    foo();    
}

Live Example

Assuming your if() statement was correct

Your if((i >= 0) || (j >= 0)) return; statement assumes neither i nor -i are negative. Then you could look at @jrok answer that uses an UB trick to set i = INT_MIN.

But seriously, rethink the logic of your program.

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You will need to use some flag besides your variable to indicate if your variable can be used or not.

There is no way to make some integer both positive and negative (except 0, I guess).

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No, you won't find any value for i to generate output with this code. Never ;D

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int is a primitive type and it can only store integer values within its range.

0 is both non-negative and non-positive. However, there is no way to get to your output string as it is.

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There are no integer not-a-numbers. I'm not entirely certain about this, but should your system have trapping integer values, the behaviour when using them is undefined under the standard.

However, for the majority of machines (using 2s complement arithmetic). all integer values are comparable, and there's no number that doesn't equal itself. One's complement arithmetic has negative and positive zero, but a specific zero will equal itself.

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The identity -INT_MIN == INT_MIN is an "incident" that happens only on the (very popular) architectures bases on 2s complement signed arithmetic. Unless yo uare writing paltform specific code, don't rely on that. It can behave differently on different machines.

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