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I have two arrays {Ai} and {Bi} of natural numbers. The sums of all elements are equal.

I need to split each element of the two arrays into three natural numbers:

Ai = A1i + A2i + A3i Bi = B1i + B2i + B3i

such that the sum of all elements of A1 is equal to the sum of all elements of B1 and the same for all the other pairs.

The important part I initially forgot about:

Each element from A1j, A2j, A3j should be between Aj/3-2 and Aj/3+2 or at least equal to one of these numbers

Each element from B1j, B2j, B3j should be between Bj/3-2 and Bj/3+2 or at least equal to one of these numbers

So the elements of arrays must be split in almost equal parts

I look for some more elegant solution than just calculating all possible variant for both arrays.

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5  
Copy A to A1. Copy B to B1. Set each element in A2, A3, B2, and B3 to zero. Perhaps there is a requirement you have omitted? –  Eric Postpischil Aug 23 '13 at 15:38
    
@EricPostpischil haha that's exemplary :D –  gen Aug 23 '13 at 15:39
    
Ooops! I made some update. So not so simple ;) –  Igor Traskunov Aug 23 '13 at 16:06
    
@EricPostpischil That was the first solution that occurred to me too... You could also set the *2 and *3 arrays to any constant number, and just adjust the original array accordingly... In other words, as stated, there is no single solution to this question... –  twalberg Aug 23 '13 at 16:06
    
I mean, all the splits of, let's say, the first array can be enumerated by the tree. Then every full branch may be compered with the branches of a tree of the second array. But I hoped there is some trick behind this problem, 'cos this straightforward approach seems to time-consuming. –  Igor Traskunov Aug 23 '13 at 16:38
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3 Answers

I look for some more elegant solution than just calculating all possible variant for both arrays.

It should be possible to divide them so that the sums of A1, A2 and A3 are near to a third of A, and the same for B. It would be easy to just make all values an exact third, but that’s not possible with natural numbers. So we have to floor the results (trivial) and distribute the remainders uniformly over the three arrays (manageable).

I don't know whether it’s the only solution, but it works in O(n) and my intuition says it will hold your invariants (though I didn’t proof it):

n = 3
for j=0 to n
    A[j] = {}
x = 0 // rotating pointer for the next subarray
for i in A
    part = floor(A[i] / n)
    rest = A[i] % n
    for j=0 to n 
        A[j][i] = part

    // distribute the rest over the arrays, and rotate the pointer
    for j=0 to rest
        A[x][i]++
        x++

/* Do the same for B */

One could also formulate the loop without the division, only distributing the single units (1) of an A[i] over the A[x][i]s:

n = 3
for j=0 to n
    A[j] = {}
    for k=0 to |A|
        A[j][i] = 0
x = 0 // rotating pointer for the next subarray
for i in A
    // distribute the rest over the arrays, and rotate the pointer
    for j=0 to A[i]
        A[x][i]++
        x++
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That would be simple. But the sum of elements of each of new arrays A1,A2,A3 must be EXACTLY equal the sum of elements of their "brothers" B1,B2,B3. –  Igor Traskunov Aug 23 '13 at 17:05
    
Have you tried it? I'm confident it works - have a look at bottom implementation (doing the division manually) - the sums of A[x] are continually increased in a rotating manner. Since |A| = |B| and sum(A) = sum(B) the part arrays should have the same sums as well. –  Bergi Aug 23 '13 at 17:27
    
@EricPostpischil: Nope, x is global and does not get re-initialized with 0 for each loop. It should put A1=[1,0] A2=[0,1] A3=[0,0] –  Bergi Aug 24 '13 at 10:11
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You should look up the principle of dynamic programming.

In this case, it seems to be similar to some coin change problems.

As for finding A1_i, A2_i, A3_i you should do it recursively:

def find_numbers(n, a, arr):
    if arr[n] not empty:
        return

    if n == 0:
        arr[n].append(a)
        return

    if a.size() > 2:
        return 
    t = n

    for each element of a:
        t -= element

    for i = 0 to :
         find_numbers(n, append(a, i), arr)

We use arr so that we do not need to compute for each number multiple times the possible combinations. If you look at the call tree after a time this function will return the combinations from the arr, and not compute them again. In your main call:

arr = []
for each n in A:
    find_number(n, [], arr)
for each n in B:
    find_number(n, [], arr)

Now you have all the combinations for each n in arr[n]. I know it is a subpart of the problem, but finding the right combinations for each A_i, B_i from arr is something really similar to this. > It is very important to read the links I gave you so that you understand the underlying theory behind.

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What is this code supposed to be doing? For each value in the array, finding each triple whose sum is that value? That is easily done iteratively, not need for wasteful recursion. And of what use is it in solving the problem posed in the question? –  Eric Postpischil Aug 23 '13 at 16:23
    
@EricPostpischil Yes it the recursion can well be transformed to iteration, however I am showing asker how this concept handles question like this. OFC iteration is more effective, but: 1. it does not matter that much, the questioner can transform it, 2. it helps him understand how we deal with it. Why do I look for the combinations? Because from that he can proceed to solving the whole problem. Something else: I think you shouldn't downvote just because it not just like copying one from another but something more relevant, it's a standalone anwser. –  gen Aug 23 '13 at 17:12
    
This answer does not help solve the problem. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 23 '13 at 17:14
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I add the stipulation that A1, A2, and A3 must be calculated from A without knowledge of B, and, similarly, B1, B2, and B3 must be calculated without knowledge of A.

The requirement that each A1i, A2i, A3i must be in [Ai/3–2, Ai/3+2] implies that the sums of the elements of A1, A2, and A3 must each be roughly one-third that of A. The stipulation compels us to define this completely.

We will construct the arrays in any serial order (e.g., from element 0 to the last element). As we do so, we will ensure the arrays remain nearly balanced.

Let x be the next element of A to be processed. Let a be round(x/3). To account for x, we must append a total of 3•a+r to the arrays A1, A2, and A3, where r is –1, 0, or +1.

Let d be sum(A1) – sum(A)/3, where the sums are of the elements processed so far. Initially, d is zero, since no elements have been processed. By design, we will ensure d is –2/3, 0, or +2/3 at each step.

Append three values as shown below to A1, A2, and A3, respectively:

  • If r is –1 and d is –2/3, append a+1, a–1, a–1. This changes d to +2/3.
  • If r is –1 and d is 0, append a–1, a, a. This changes d to –2/3.
  • If r is –1 and d is +2/3, append a–1, a, a. This changes d to 0.
  • If r is 0, append a, a, a. This leaves d unchanged.
  • If r is +1 and d is –2/3, append a+1, a, a. This changes d to 0.
  • If r is +1 and d is 0, append a+1, a, a. This changes d to +2/3.
  • If r is +1 and d is +2/3, append a–1, a+1, a+1. This changes d to –2/3.

At the end, the sums of A1, A2, and A3 are uniquely determined by the sum of A modulo three. The sum of A1 is (sum(A3)–2)/3, sum(A3)/3, or (sum(A3)+2)/3 according to whether the sum of A modulo three is congruent to –1, 0, or +1, respectively.


Completing the demonstration:

In any case, a–1, a, or a+1 is appended to an array. a is round(x/3), so it differs from x/3 by less than 1, so a–1, a, and a+1 each differ from x/3 by less than 2, satisfying the constraint that the values must be in [Ai/3–2, Ai/3+2].

When B1, B2, and B3 are prepared in the same way as shown above for A1, A2, and A3, their sums are determined by the sum of B3. Since the sum of A equals the sum of B, the sums of A1, A2, and A3 equal the sums of B1, B2, and B3, respectively.

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Why was this downvoted? –  Bergi Aug 24 '13 at 10:15
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