Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question is an exact duplicate of:

I have a homework question. I should create a dictionary represent the following:

North leads to the garden. South leads to the kitchen. East leads to the dining room. West leads to the living room.

The player should be prompted for a direction and respond with the location that is off in that direction. For example, if the player enters north, the program should respond: North leads to the garden. If the player enters an invalid direction, the program should ignore the input and ask for another direction. The program will end when the player enters quit.

My problem is when the user enter "quit" the program doesn't exit. So I dnt understand why my while statement is not working. Here is my code:

 #Create a Dictionary to represent the possible
 #exits from a location in an adventure game

 game = {"north" : "North leads to garden.",
    "south" : "South leads to the kitchen.",
    "east" : "East leads to the dining room.",
    "west" : "West leads to the living room."}
 print "Press quit to exit"

 direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ")
 while direction != "quit":
     direction = direction.lower()

     if direction in game:
         location = game[direction]
         direction = direction.lower()
         print location


     if direction not in game:
         direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ")
         location = game[direction]
         direction = direction.lower()
         print location

     raw_input("\n\nPress quit to exit")
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jon Clements, iCodez, mata, Chris Cameron, Makoto Aug 24 '13 at 2:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
When are they entering "quit"? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 23 '13 at 16:22
4  
Could you indent your code properly? We don't know what is outside the loop and what is actually in the loop. Same for if statements – Paco Aug 23 '13 at 16:25
    
They should enter "quit" at the beginning of the program. – Rui Costa Aug 23 '13 at 16:28
    
@Kevin London, how did you choose those indents? Why would our OP continuously loop direction = direction.lower()? – scohe001 Aug 23 '13 at 17:28
1  
Your code is very C-like. I would recommend watching this presentation by Raymond Hertinger to get a leg up on the class and programming using the strengths of python. speakerdeck.com/pyconslides/… – beroe Aug 24 '13 at 0:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As with the others here, I can't be entirely sure of what your code is trying to do because of the lack of indents, but taking a shot in the dark, it may be easier to use a method for getting the direction that will handle bad directions. So your code can become:

   #Create a Dictionary to represent the possible
   #exits from a location in an adventure game

def get_dir():
    good_answers = ["north", "south", "east", "west", "quit"]
    direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ").lower()
    while direction not in good_answers:
        direction = raw_input("Bad direction, try again: ").lower()
    return direction

game = {"north" : "North leads to garden.",
    "south" : "South leads to the kitchen.",
    "east" : "East leads to the dining room.",
    "west" : "West leads to the living room."}

print "Press quit to exit"
direction = get_dir()
while direction != "quit":
    print game[direction]
    direction = get_dir()

print "Quitting..."
share|improve this answer

I can't be sure because of how you have indented your code but I believe the problem is:

raw_input("\n\nPress quit to exit")

Should be:

direction = raw_input("\n\nPress quit to exit")

However, there are a couple of things wrong.

if direction not in game:        
     direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ")
     location = game[direction]
     direction = direction.lower()
     print location

At this point of the code the direction entered is not quit nor is it in the dictionary so if we enter quit at this point we get:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "homework.py", line 21, in <module>
    location = game[direction]
KeyError: 'quit'

We can solve this in two ways, either we can try it and then deal with the exception or we can check membership of the dictionary again. For example:

if direction not in game:        
     try:
         direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ")
         location = game[direction]
         direction = direction.lower()
         print location
     except KeyError:
          pass

I have only used except KeyError as you don't want to get into silencing all exceptions as you will loose valuable information while debugging. You have shown you know how to check if it is in the dictionary so there is no need to show that approach again.

So if we put it together we get:

#Create a Dictionary to represent the possible
#exits from a location in an adventure game

game = {"north" : "North leads to garden.",
        "south" : "South leads to the kitchen.",
        "east" : "East leads to the dining room.",
        "west" : "West leads to the living room."
}

direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ")

while direction != "quit":
    direction = direction.lower()
    if direction in game:
        location = game[direction]
        direction = direction.lower()
        print location

    if direction not in game:        
         try:
             direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ")
             location = game[direction]
             direction = direction.lower()
             print location
         except KeyError:
             pass

    direction = raw_input("\n\nPress quit to exit: ")

Once we have got to this point we should look at how the program is running, we can see we are asking for user multiple times for input during the execution of the script, setting the same variable. Now we have got something working we should look at removing the needed calls. Since we have added the try: except bloc: we don't need the previous check for membership in the dictionary which leaves us with:

#Create a Dictionary to represent the possible
#exits from a location in an adventure game

game = {"north" : "North leads to garden.",
        "south" : "South leads to the kitchen.",
        "east" : "East leads to the dining room.",
        "west" : "West leads to the living room."
}    
# Initialize the direction variable
direction = ""
# Keep looping user types in quit
while direction != "quit":   
         try:
             # Take the user input at the start of the loop
             direction = raw_input("Enter your direction Or quit to exit: ")
             # Get the location string if it exists
             location = game[direction]
             # Make the string lower case
             direction = direction.lower()
             # Display location message
             print location
         # If this KeyError is raised user has entered a location not in the
         # dictionary
         except KeyError:
             # We can do nothing because we are just going to get new user input
             # next time the loop runs!
             pass

At this point I think its good to remove any cargo code, why are we using:

location = game[direction]
direction = direction.lower()

If we wanted the directions in lower case we could have defined them as lower case ten lines above, secondly asking the same message all the time is annoying so we are going to ask a septate quit message. So after removing the unneeded lines we get:

game = {"north" : "North leads to garden.",
       "south" : "South leads to the kitchen.",
       "east" : "East leads to the dining room.",
        "west" : "West leads to the living room."
}

direction = ""

while direction != "quit":   
         try:
             direction = raw_input("Enter your direction: ").lower()
             print game[direction]
         except KeyError:
             direction = raw_input("The direction you have entered is invalid\nEnter a direction or quit to exit: ")

Here I have also removed the location variable, in this instance it is unneeded as direction is the key information. Also a KeyError is still raised when trying to print a Key that doesn't exist so that's all cool!

Just to note also if you wanted to call .lower() you don't need to set a variable first you can do it while accessing the dictionary as so:

print game[direction].lower()
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to create a while statement that when the program ask for a direction,and if the user enters the word "quit", the program automatically ends or exit, because quit is not a direction. If the user enters the right direction a location it will be displayed as a message or If the user enters a wrong direction or a direction that is not in my dictionary the program ask user to enter a direction again. – Rui Costa Aug 23 '13 at 16:51
    
I have updated my question again, once piece of advice would be, if your currently not using spaces switch your indentation to 4 spaces for a tab. Then when you are going to copy code into stack select the whole section of code you want to copy and add an extra tab. This will add the required four spaces of indent for code and also will mean when you copy that code onto the site the indentation will be correct and help people help you! Good luck – Noelkd Aug 24 '13 at 1:23
    
@RuiCosta any reason why you unaccepted this answer? – Noelkd Aug 25 '13 at 18:03

If you wait for input anyway, then it would be easier to simply do one "if" for the case they're quiting, an "elif" for the case that it's an actual direction and a simple "else" at the end if they type in gibberish.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.