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I came to a part in my java program where I need to round up to the nearest hundered and thought that there was probably some way to do it but I guess not. So I seared the net for examples or any answers and I've yet to find any since all examples appear to be to the nearest hundred. I just want to do this and round UP. Maybe there's some simple solution that I'm overlooking. I have tried Math.ceil and other functions but have not found an answer as of yet. If anyone could help me with this issue I would greatly appreciate it!!!

If my number is 203, I want the result rounded to be 300. You get the point.

  1. 801->900
  2. 99->100
  3. 14->100
  4. 452->500
share|improve this question
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Take advantage of integer division, which truncates the decimal portion of the quotient. To make it look like it's rounding up, add 99 first.

int rounded = ((num + 99) / 100 ) * 100;

Examples:

801: ((801 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 900 / 100 * 100 → 9 * 100 = 900
99 : ((99 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 198 / 100 * 100 → 1 * 100 = 100
14 : ((14 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 113 / 100 * 100 → 1 * 100 = 100
452: ((452 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 551 / 100 * 100 → 5 * 100 = 500
203: ((203 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 302 / 100 * 100 → 3 * 100 = 300
200: ((200 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 299 / 100 * 100 → 2 * 100 = 200

Relevant Java Language Specification quote, Section 15.17.2:

Integer division rounds toward 0. That is, the quotient produced for operands n and d that are integers after binary numeric promotion (§5.6.2) is an integer value q whose magnitude is as large as possible while satisfying |d · q| ≤ |n|.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I never thought of taking advantage of truncation like that. This answer is pretty awesome. Thank you very much for teaching me something! – Tastybrownies Aug 23 '13 at 16:34
    
*Side note --- if you are working with float point values, rather than casting an int, most languages support a floor function in some way or another. – Albert Renshaw Jul 15 '14 at 3:52
    
@DaSh Yes it works. Rounding 0 up to the nearest hundred is 0, because 0 is the nearest multiple of 100, and ((0 + 99) / 100) * 100 -> 99 / 100 * 100 -> 0 * 100 = 0. – rgettman Dec 1 '14 at 17:16
    
@rgettman My bad. – Daniil Shevelev Dec 1 '14 at 17:48

Here is an algorithm which I belive works for any "multiple of" case. Let me know what you think.

int round (int number,int multiple){

    int result = multiple;

    //If not already multiple of given number

    if (number % multiple != 0){

        int division = (number / multiple)+1;

        result = division * multiple;

    }

    return result;

}
share|improve this answer
int roundUpNumberByUsingMultipleValue(double number, int multiple) {

        int result = multiple;

        if (number % multiple == 0) {
            return (int) number;
        }

        // If not already multiple of given number

        if (number % multiple != 0) {

            int division = (int) ((number / multiple) + 1);

            result = division * multiple;

        }
        return result;

    }

Example:
System.out.println("value 1 =" + round(100.125,100));   
System.out.println("value 2 =" + round(163,50));
System.out.println("value 3 =" + round(200,100));
System.out.println("value 4 =" + round(235.33333333,100));
System.out.println("value 5 =" + round(0,100));

OutPut: 
value 1 =200
value 2 =200
value 3 =200
value 4 =300
value 5 =0
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Posting just a piece of code does not help a lot, you should consider adding some explanation to you answers. – mohacs Jul 19 '14 at 13:57

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