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I was writing a tokenizer that would split a string and put each of the fields inside a vector. My idea was to use string::find repeatedly. Instead of using a temporary string object, I used move_iterators, as I supposed the original string would see its characters stolen as the algorithm processed it. But it didn't happen.

This is an example code that demonstrates what I'm talking about:

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void
print_strings
    ( const vector<string> & v )
{
    unsigned int i = 1;
    for ( const auto & s : v )
        cout << "#" << i++ << "\t: \"" << s << "\"" << endl;
    return;
}

int
main
    ( void )
{
    string base( "hello, this is an example string, I like icescreams" );

    /* Vector to populate with strings */
    vector<string> v;

    /* 1: a copy of 'base' */
    v.emplace_back( base );
    /* 2: a copy of 'base' using iterators */
    v.emplace_back( base.begin() , base.end() );
    /* 3: a string that I think _should_ move from 'base' */
    v.emplace_back( make_move_iterator(base.begin()) , make_move_iterator(base.end()) );

    /* Print the strings twice so that we
     * can see if something has changed. */
    print_strings( v );
    print_strings( v );

    return 0;
}

When compiled with g++ -std=c++11 -Wall -Wextra -Werror -O2, it shows no warnings.

My guessings are that string's constructors, in its range version, always copies from the specified range. As I'm not sure, I'd like to be sure and, of course, to see any workarounds you had used.

Best regards, Kalrish

share|improve this question
    
Moving from a char it the same as copying from it. You also never print base to see if it changed. –  jrok Aug 23 '13 at 16:34
    
@jrok Indeed, I forgot to do that. Now that I've tried it, I can say base is not modified. –  Kalrish Aug 23 '13 at 16:40
    
There is no single rvalue in that sample –  Dieter Lücking Aug 23 '13 at 16:44
    
What do you think moving a char from a std::string should do? This is an X/Y problem: your solution (moving char from a std::string) is not your problem -- your problem is something else, and you thought "moving char will solve it, wait, it does not work". Describe your concrete problem, describe what is supposed to happen to some data, and give examples of what state the data is in before and after the code that you don't know how to write. Maybe even give your alternative implementation that you want to avoid. –  Yakk Aug 23 '13 at 17:40

1 Answer 1

Iterators don't know anything about the container.

A move_iterator can't magically move from the string. It can't only move from its underlying element, that's a single char and moving from a char is the same as copying it. You need to use std::move(base).

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void
print_strings
    ( const vector<string> & v )
{
    unsigned int i = 1;
    for ( const auto & s : v )
        cout << "#" << i++ << "\t: \"" << s << "\"" << endl;
    return;
}

int
main
    ( void )
{
    string base( "hello, this is an example string, I like icescreams" );

    /* Vector to populate with strings */
    vector<string> v;

    /* 1: a copy of 'base' */
    v.emplace_back( base );
    /* 2: a copy of 'base' using iterators */
    v.emplace_back( base.begin() , base.end() );
    /* 3: a string that I think _should_ move from 'base' */

    std::cout << base << '\n'; // base is still untouched here

    v.emplace_back( std::move(base) ); // now it'll be moved from

    print_strings( v );
    std::cout << "base: " << base << "/base\n"; // base is empty
    return 0;
}

See it live here.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that I'd like to move from a range, not the entire string. –  Kalrish Aug 23 '13 at 16:48
    
You already did that, conceptualy, with move_iterators. It's just that you dont' really gain much with std::string. What (I think) you'd want is to "steal" a part of string's buffer. That can't be done, I'm afraid. –  jrok Aug 23 '13 at 16:55
    
If, as you state, is not possible, I guess this question makes no sense. I'll go with temporaries. Thank you for your help! –  Kalrish Aug 23 '13 at 17:03

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