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I'm currently learning how to work with Lists in Java. I've come across sorting Strings in a List by using Collections.sort() method and that works fine. However when I create a user-defined datatype, it doesn't sort and gives an error -

"no suitable method found for sort(List) method Collections.sort(List,Comparator) is not applicable (cannot instantiate from arguments because actual and formal argument lists differ in length) method Collections.sort(List) is not applicable (inferred type does not conform to declared bound(s) inferred: Child bound(s): Comparable) where T#1,T#2 are type-variables: T#1 extends Object declared in method sort(List,Comparator) T#2 extends Comparable declared in method sort(List)"

How can I sort the elements for a user-defined type?

Here is the code -

CODE -

package works;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Collections;

class Child 
{
private String name;
public Child(String name)
{
    this.name=name;
}
@Override
public String toString()
{
    return name;
}
}
class LOL
{
void Meth()
{
    Child s1 = new Child("Hi");
    Child s2 = new Child("Bye");
    Child s3 = new Child("And");
    List<Child> f1 = Arrays.asList(s1,s2,s3);
    System.out.println(f1);
    System.out.println();
    Collections.sort(f1);  // This line is the erroneous line.
}
}
public class SortColl
{
public static void main(String X[])
{
    LOL l = new LOL();
    l.Meth();

}
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Sorting an ArrayList of Person with java collections –  Rohit Jain Aug 23 '13 at 16:39
1  
You shouldn't capitalize the first letter of your methods (except constructors). Meth() should be meth() –  KidTempo Aug 23 '13 at 16:48
    
I'll keep that in mind. Thank you –  Sidsec9 Aug 23 '13 at 17:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Implement Comparable in the Child class

class Child implements Comparable<Child>{
    private String name;

    public Child(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return name;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Child child) {
        return name.compareTo(child.name);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That worked but the sorting is descending? How can I sort it in ascending manner? –  Sidsec9 Aug 23 '13 at 16:43
1  
@Sidsec9 change the compareTo method to return name.compareTo(child.name) or even easier: just multiply the result by -1: return -1 * child.name.compareTo(name);. By the way, do some effort before just posting a question here –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 23 '13 at 16:44
1  
@Sidsec9 ok, corrected...... –  Reimeus Aug 23 '13 at 16:49
    
@LuiggiMendoza, thank you for the help, I've been trying this code to work for the whole day with no success, I didn't notice the return type to be int out of desperation else I would've tried multiplying it with -1. I'll pay attention next time. –  Sidsec9 Aug 23 '13 at 16:54
    
@Reimeus I have another doubt, suppose class Child and class LOL are separate classes and belong to the same package. The package is imported and there is a constraint that no changes are to be made in class Child (like implementing Comparable<Child>) and all the necessary modifications are to be done in class LOL, how would you sort the list then? –  Sidsec9 Aug 23 '13 at 17:09

To sort a collection of any object, one of the following must be true:

  1. The object must implement Comparable. In this case, implement Comparable<Child>. Then Collections.sort will be able to sort using the compareTo method.
  2. Create your own class that implements Comparator, specifically Comparator<Child>, and pass an instance of that class as the second parameter to Collections.sort. Then the sorting algorithm will use the Comparator to sort the collection.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for Comparator<Child>. It's immensely useful when sorting a class you cannot change, or needing to do a one-off sort, or sorting a class that already implements Comparable in a different way. –  KidTempo Aug 23 '13 at 16:51

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