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I need to match an integer that is either -1, or any positive integer (but not 0). This should be possible using regex, but I've always found it difficult to grasp.

I'd be very grateful if someone couldtell me how to match it, and provide a good explanation at the same time, so I learn something.

Thanks.

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closed as off-topic by pilcrow, amon, Jack Maney, Sinan Ünür, stema Sep 19 '13 at 10:02

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3  
Of course this can be done. What have you tried so far? –  amon Aug 23 '13 at 16:45
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Regular expressions are for matching patterns, not checking numeric values. Find a likely string with the regex, then check its numeric value in whatever your host language is (PHP, whatever). –  Andy Lester Aug 23 '13 at 20:17
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't try to be too cleaver. I would simply do this:

if (( $value == int( $value ) and $value > 0 ) or $value == -1 ) {
  ....
}

and avoid regular expressions which can be prone to errors -- especially when they get overly complicated.

This makes it absolutely clear what you want. You want an integer that's greater than 0, or is -1. Plus, it wouldn't surprise me if this is actually more efficient than parsing a regular expression.

Let's look at this solution:

if ( $value =~ /-1|[1-9][0-9]*/ ) {
    ....
}

This will match -1 and will match 42, but not 0. However, it will also match -1344 and 1vvv. Nor, will it match ٢٤ which is the integer 42 in Arabic.

Most of programming is you (or the poor sucker who comes after you) maintaining your program: Adding features, tracking down bugs.

Don't try to be too cleaver. Just because something takes fewer lines to type doesn't mean its more efficient or better.

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I like this approach, might be because I actually understand the solution. Thank you. –  Andreas Aug 26 '13 at 13:18
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You can use a pattern like this:

-1|[1-9][0-9]*

This will match a either literal -1 or a single digit from 1 to 9, followed by zero or more digits from 0 to 9.

If you'd like to ensure that this number is the only thing allowed in the input string, place start (^) and end ($) anchors around the pattern:

^-1|[1-9][0-9]*$
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This will match -123323, foobar-1barbar, and 323.32. –  David W. Aug 23 '13 at 18:48
    
@DavidW. OP stated, "I need to match an integer that is either -1, or any positive integer (but not 0).", this is exactly what Bohemian and I provided. OP did not state that it should be the only text allowed in the input string, simply that only those numbers should be matched. However, I've included a note about how to require that if it's necessary. –  p.s.w.g Aug 23 '13 at 18:57
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Try this regex OR:

/^-1|[1-9]\d*$/

See this regex working in a live demo


The above regex disallows positive numbers with leading zeroes. If you want to allow that, try this, which uses a negative look ahead to preclude all zeroes:

/^-1|(?!0+$)\d+$/

See this regex working in a live demo

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You second solution presumes that the zeros continue to the end of the string. Zeroes followed by any non-digit will defeat it. Perhaps replacing the $ with something like ($|\D) would be of value? –  tjd Aug 23 '13 at 17:12
    
"000q" and "000 \n" are 2 examples that will produce false positives. –  tjd Aug 23 '13 at 18:09
    
This doesn't work. Plus, it's hard to parse what you're looking for. –  David W. Aug 23 '13 at 18:49
    
@DavidW. I've added & and $ to both regexes, and provided rubular links showing they work. –  Bohemian Aug 23 '13 at 21:35
    
@tjd Good point! I've added & and $ to both regexes, and provided rubular links showing they work. –  Bohemian Aug 23 '13 at 21:36
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