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There is already a thread dealing with interpolation between raster layers of different years (2006,2008,2010,2012). Now I tried to linearly extrapolate to 2020 with the approach suggested by @Ram Narasimhan and approxExtrap from the Hmisc package:

library(raster)
library(Hmisc)

df <- data.frame("2006" = 1:9, "2008" = 3:11, "2010" = 5:13, "2012"=7:15)

#transpose since we want time to be the first col, and the values to be columns
new <- data.frame(t(df))
times <- seq(2006, 2012, by=2)
new <- cbind(times, new)

# Now, apply Linear Extrapolate for each layer of the raster
approxExtrap(new, xout=c(2006:2012), rule = 2)

But instead of getting something like this:

#  times X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7 X8 X9
#1  2006  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
#2  2007  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
#3  2008  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
#4  2009  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
#5  2010  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13
#6  2011  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14
#7  2012  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15
#8  2013  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
#9  2014  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
#10 2015 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
#11 2016 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
#12 2017 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
#13 2018 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
#14 2019 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
#15 2020 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

I get this:

$x
 [1] 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

$y
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15

This is quite confusing as both approxTime and approxExtrap are based on approxfun.

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1 Answer 1

I found a way to make this work, although it doesn't seem to be the most elegant way to do it. The basic idea is to perform a linear interpolation with approxTime first, then use lm to fit a linear model to the time-series and extrapolate by using predict and the final year of extrapolation. The data gap between the final year and the end-year of the first interpolation is than filled by a second linear interpolation using approxTime again.

NOTE: The first linear interpolation is not really necessary, although I don't know if it makes any difference when you use more sophisticated data.

library(raster)
library(Hmisc)
library(simecol)


df <- data.frame("2006" = 1:9, "2008" = 3:11, "2010" = 5:13, "2012"=7:15)

#transpose since we want time to be the first col, and the values to be columns
new <- data.frame(t(df))
times <- seq(2006, 2012, by=2)
new <- cbind(times, new)



# Now, apply Linear Interpolate for each layer of the raster
intp<-approxTime(new, 2006:2012, rule = 2)

#Extract the years from the data.frame
tm<-intp[,1]

#Define a function for a linear model using lm
lm.func<-function(i) {lm(i ~ tm)}

#Define a new data.frame without the years from intp
intp.new<-intp[,-1]

#Creates a list of the lm coefficients for each column of intp.new
lm.list<-apply(intp.new, MARGIN=2, FUN=lm.func)

#Create a data.frame of the final year of your extrapolation; keep the name of tm data.frame
new.pred<-data.frame(tm = 2020)

#Make predictions for the final year for each element of lm.list
pred.points<-lapply(lm.frame, predict, new.pred)

#unlist the predicted points
fintime<-matrix(unlist(pred.points))

#Add the final year to the fintime matrix and transpond it
fintime.new<-t(rbind(2020,fintime))

#Convert the intp data.frame into a matrix
intp.ma<-as.matrix(intp)

#Append fintime.new to intp.ma
intp.wt<-as.data.frame(rbind(intp.ma,fintime.new))

#Perform an linear interpolation with approxTime again
approxTime(intp.wt, 2006:2020, rule = 2)


times X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7 X8 X9
1   2006  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
2   2007  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
3   2008  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
4   2009  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
5   2010  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13
6   2011  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14
7   2012  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15
8   2013  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
9   2014  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
10  2015 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
11  2016 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
12  2017 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
13  2018 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
14  2019 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
15  2020 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
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