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For example, for an asynchronous IO by using TCP/IP (using POSIX poll/select or more advanced epoll, kqueue, poll_set, IOCP), network driver starts by an interruption in different (hardware demultiplexer) CPU-cores, receives messages and dump them into a single (multiplexer) buffer at the kernel level. Then, our thread-acceptor by using epoll / kqueue / poll_set / IOCP receives from this single buffer a list of descriptors of sockets of messages which came and again scatters (demultiplexer) across threads (in thread-pool) running on different CPU-cores.

In short scheme looks like: hardware interruption (hardware demultiplexor) -> network driver in kernel space (multiplexor) -> user's acceptor in user space by using epoll / kqueue / poll_set / IOCP (demultiplexor)

Is not it easier and faster, to get rid of the last two links, and use only the "hardware demultiplexor"?

An example. If a network packet arrives, the network card will interrupt the CPU. On most systems today, these interrupts are distributed across cores. I.e. this work is a hardware demultiplexer. After receiving such an interruption, we can immediately process this network's message and wait for the next interrupt. All work for demultiplexing is done at the level of the hardware, by using a CPU interrupt.

In Cortex-A5 MPCore: http://infocenter.arm.com/help/index.jsp?topic=/com.arm.doc.ddi0434b/CCHDBEBE.html

Is it feasible an approach in all of Linux, in real-time *nix such as QNX, and are there public projects where this approach is used, may be ngnix?

UPDATE:

Simple answer to my question - yes I can use hardware demultiplexing by using /proc/irq/<N>/smp_affinity: http://www.alexonlinux.com/smp-affinity-and-proper-interrupt-handling-in-linux

But second notice - it is not such a good thing, because different part of one packet can handled by different cores, and it can take time to cache synchronization (L1(CoreX)->L3->L1(CoreY)) for cache coherency: http://www.alexonlinux.com/why-interrupt-affinity-with-multiple-cores-is-not-such-a-good-thing

SOLUTIONS:

  • hard-bind different ethernet adapters(its IRQs) to the different single CPU-cores
  • use large packets and small messages, when packet often contain whole message completely

QUESTION: But may be there are some better solutions, an example using soft-IRQ (without hardware-IRQ) when we recieve a batch of some network packets from network adapter manualy, are there?

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Hardware interrupts are serviced by a single core on Linux (at least it used to, haven't kept up with recent changes). You can get more parallelism if you opportunistically poll for the data events in the kernel. Read this Facebook blog entry. –  jxh Aug 23 '13 at 17:33
    
@jxh I understand, that they uses: per-thread shared buffer-pool for connections, UDP, separate sockets for UDP, lock for batch dequeues for transmit, correct multithreaded collection of statistics. –  Alex Aug 23 '13 at 18:49
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They modified the network driver to poll when they entered the driver to do write out data to the network adapter or read data from the network adapter. Companies tend to standardize the equipment they purchase, so it is probably just a single driver. Since the kernel thread entering the driver could be running on any CPU, they achieve greater concurrency and load balancing. –  jxh Aug 23 '13 at 18:55
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It would take too long to explain completely. Network driver can ask device if there is data directly (this is the poll) and get back an immediate yes or no answer, and if the answer is yes, it can drain the network device buffers directly. Normally, network device will raise hardware interrupt, and kernel CPU-0 will service it, and populate device driver buffers with data. –  jxh Aug 23 '13 at 19:46
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If kernel thread enter driver and polls, it is handling the event inline without issuing hardware interrupt it is not going back to CPU-0. That is why it is more efficient. The demultiplexing (sorting the data to the proper sockets) is still software. Hardware typically does not have socket awareness, so a hardware demultiplexor would not be possible. But you can at least allow more than one CPU service data available form the hardware, and it gives you a speed up that alleviates the need for a hardware demultiplexor. –  jxh Aug 23 '13 at 20:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simple answer to my question - yes I can use hardware demultiplexing by using /proc/irq/<N>/smp_affinity: http://www.alexonlinux.com/smp-affinity-and-proper-interrupt-handling-in-linux

But second notice - it is not such a good thing, because different part of one packet can handled by different cores, and it can take time to cache synchronization (L1(CoreX)->L3->L1(CoreY)) for cache coherency: http://www.alexonlinux.com/why-interrupt-affinity-with-multiple-cores-is-not-such-a-good-thing

SOLUTIONS:

  • hard-bind different ethernet adapters(its IRQs) to the different single CPU-cores
  • use large packets and small messages, when packet often contain whole message completely
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You ask a rather broad question.

... to get rid of the last two links, and use only the "hardware demultiplexor"?

From you description I understand that what you really want is for hardware to provide the received data to user's application. Isn't it? This can be achieved with RDMA.

Hardware (network card) can provide the received data in a pre-allocated buffer w/o CPU being involved in this procedure.

I could elaborate, but I'm not sure this direction is what you are asking about.

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Thanks, I know that RDMA over Infiniband/PCIE[Compact Serial] much more faster and can work without any interrupts(zero-copy/zero-cycles). But I mean recieve packets from long distance from client, and if I recieve by TCP over Ethernet I can't use real RDMA. I added some to my question and I want something like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/18383698/… –  Alex Aug 27 '13 at 12:34

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