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I was writing a new random number generator for numpy that produces random numbers according to an arbitrary distribution when I came across this really weird behavior:

this is test.pyx

#cython: boundscheck=False
#cython: wraparound=False
import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np
cimport cython

def BareBones(np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] a,np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] u,r):
    return u

def UntypedWithLoop(a,u,r):
    cdef int i,j=0
    for i in range(u.shape[0]):
        j+=i
    return u,j

def BSReplacement(np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] a, np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] u):
    cdef np.ndarray[np.int_t, ndim=1] r=np.empty(u.shape[0],dtype=int)
    cdef int i,j=0
    for i in range(u.shape[0]):
        j=i
    return r

setup.py

from distutils.core import setup
from Cython.Build import cythonize
setup(name = "simple cython func",ext_modules = cythonize('test.pyx'),)

profiling code

#!/usr/bin/python
from __future__ import division

import subprocess
import timeit

#Compile the cython modules before importing them
subprocess.call(['python', 'setup.py', 'build_ext', '--inplace'])

sstr="""
import test
import numpy
u=numpy.random.random(10)
a=numpy.random.random(10)
a=numpy.cumsum(a)
a/=a[-1]
r=numpy.empty(10,int)
"""

print "binary search: creates an array[N] and performs N binary searches to fill it:\n",timeit.timeit('numpy.searchsorted(a,u)',sstr)
print "Simple replacement for binary search:takes the same args as np.searchsorted and similarly returns a new array. this performs only one trivial operation per element:\n",timeit.timeit('test.BSReplacement(a,u)',sstr)

print "barebones function doing nothing:",timeit.timeit('test.BareBones(a,u,r)',sstr)
print "Untyped inputs and doing N iterations:",timeit.timeit('test.UntypedWithLoop(a,u,r)',sstr)
print "time for just np.empty()",timeit.timeit('numpy.empty(10,int)',sstr)

The binary search implementation takes in the order of len(u)*Log(len(a)) time to execute. The trivial cython function takes in the order of len(u) to run. Both return a 1D int array of len(u).

however, even this no computation trivial implementation takes longer than the full binary search in the numpy library. (it was written in C: https://github.com/numpy/numpy/blob/202e78d607515e0390cffb1898e11807f117b36a/numpy/core/src/multiarray/item_selection.c see PyArray_SearchSorted)

The results are:

binary search: creates an array[N] and performs N binary searches to fill it:
1.15157485008
Simple replacement for binary search:takes the same args as np.searchsorted and similarly returns a new array. this performs only one trivial operation per element:
3.69442796707
barebones function doing nothing: 0.87496304512
Untyped inputs and doing N iterations: 0.244267940521
time for just np.empty() 1.0983929634

Why is the np.empty() step taking so much time? and what can I do to get an empty array that I can return ?

The C function does this AND runs a whole bunch of sanity checks AND uses a longer algorithm in the inner loop. (i removed all the logic except the loop itself fro my example)


Update

It turns out there are two distinct problems:

  1. The np.empty(10) call alone has a ginormous overhead and takes as much time as it takes for searchsorted to make a new array AND perform 10 binary searches on it
  2. Just declaring the buffer syntax np.ndarray[...] also has a massive overhead that takes up MORE time than receiving the untyped variables AND iterating 50 times.

results for 50 iterations:

binary search: 2.45336699486
Simple replacement:3.71126317978
barebones function doing nothing: 0.924916028976
Untyped inputs and doing N iterations: 0.316384077072
time for just np.empty() 1.04949498177
share|improve this question
    
It's confusing when you name the imported and cimported numpys the same, in scikits image they normally do import numpy as np; cimport numpy as cnp to differentiate them. But I think the np in your call to np.empty is the imported one, and there is no cimported, so it is a Python function call, with it's well known overhead. You can probably call PyArray_SimpleNew from Cython to avoid it, not sure how. If you are worrying about this level of optimization, drop Cython and go C-API all the way... –  Jaime Aug 23 '13 at 19:58
1  
@Jaime importing and then cimporting numpy as np is standard usage, albeit confusing. I've seen it done the way you mentioned as well though docs.cython.org/src/tutorial/numpy.html#adding-types I think the way the cython docs suggest probably rebinds the cython variants to the same name when available just as what happens when you have a standard name space collision in python –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '13 at 20:11
    
@JoshAdel My whole point was it is not clear to me whether calling np.empty is making a Python function call, which I think would explain the overhead, or a Cython variant, which would indicate something in Cython is not that good. But the only Cython I have ever written was the 'Hello World!' from the docs: I found it confusing, mostly from it being hard to figure out whether something was running in fast C or slow Python, and moved on all the way to the Python/NumPy C-API. So my opinion is biased and not very informed... –  Jaime Aug 23 '13 at 22:28
1  
@Jaime I always find it helpful to use cython -a to get an annotated version of the code that colors line-by-line things that are calling out to the Python API and also allows you to select a line and look at the corresponding generated C code. –  JoshAdel Aug 24 '13 at 0:24

2 Answers 2

There is a discussion of this on the Cython list that might have some useful suggestions: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/cython-users/CwtU_jYADgM

Generally though I try to allocate small arrays outside of Cython, pass them in and re-use them in subsequent calls to the method. I understand that this is not always an option.

share|improve this answer

Creating np.empty inside the Cython function has some overhead as you already saw. Here you will see an example about how to create the empty array and pass it to the Cython module in order to fill with the correct values:

n=10:

numpy.searchsorted: 1.30574745517
cython O(1): 3.28732016088
cython no array declaration 1.54710909596

n=100:

numpy.searchsorted: 4.15200545373
cython O(1): 13.7273431067
cython no array declaration 11.4186086744

As you already pointed out, the numpy version scales better since it is O(len(u)*long(len(a))) and this algorithm here is O(len(u)*len(a))...

I also tried to use Memoryview, basically changing np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] by double[:], but the first option was faster in this case.

The new .pyx file is:

from __future__ import division
import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np
cimport cython

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
def JustLoop(np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] a, np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] u,
             np.ndarray[int, ndim=1] r):
    cdef int i,j
    for j in range(u.shape[0]):
        if u[j] < a[0]:
            r[j] = 0
            continue

        if u[j] > a[a.shape[0]-1]:
            r[j] = a.shape[0]-1
            continue

        for i in range(1, a.shape[0]):
            if u[j] >= a[i-1] and u[j] < a[i]:
                r[j] = i
                break

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
def WithArray(np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] a, np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] u):
    cdef np.ndarray[np.int_t, ndim=1] r=np.empty(u.shape[0],dtype=int)
    cdef int i,j
    for j in range(u.shape[0]):
        if u[j] < a[0]:
            r[j] = 0
            continue

        if u[j] > a[a.shape[0]-1]:
            r[j] = a.shape[0]-1
            continue

        for i in range(1, a.shape[0]):
            if u[j] >= a[i-1] and u[j] < a[i]:
                r[j] = i
                break
    return r

The new .py file:

import numpy
import subprocess
import timeit

#Compile the cython modules before importing them
subprocess.call(['python', 'setup.py', 'build_ext', '--inplace'])
from test import *

sstr="""
import test
import numpy
u=numpy.random.random(10)
a=numpy.random.random(10)
a=numpy.cumsum(a)
a/=a[-1]
a.sort()
r = numpy.empty(u.shape[0], dtype=int)
"""

print "numpy.searchsorted:",timeit.timeit('numpy.searchsorted(a,u)',sstr)
print "cython O(1):",timeit.timeit('test.WithArray(a,u)',sstr)
print "cython no array declaration",timeit.timeit('test.JustLoop(a,u,r)',sstr)
share|improve this answer
1  
1)the cumulative sum step generates and increasing sequence, so sorting is unnecessary (2) the scaling is because you have used a linear search algorithm while the numpy function most probably uses a O(logn) binary search. (3) I left out the actual working part of the code so I could study only the overhead. –  staticd Aug 24 '13 at 9:17
    
@staticd Please, check here, as you can see a must be sorted in ascending order or at least you must pass the argsort of it using the sorter argument.. –  Saullo Castro Aug 24 '13 at 9:20
1  
a=numpy.cumsum(a) generates an ascending sequence as it is a cumulative sum. (out[i]=in[i]+out[i-1]) this step generates a cumulative distribution from some random probabilities. We can use this to get a index with probability corresponding to the original "a" by using searchsorted to get the inverse. –  staticd Aug 24 '13 at 10:38
    
thank you, was did not pay enough attention to that fact, so the sort() call is unnecesary here... –  Saullo Castro Aug 24 '13 at 10:47

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