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I am working with a javascript object and although I have a solution I cant help but think it can be done more efficiently.

the object is returned from an ajax call to php script

r.price_array[1] = 39.99
r.price_array[5] = 24.99
r.price_array[10] = 19.99
and so on....

what i am doing now is searching between the key values (key values represent a quantity)

qty = $(this).val();

if (qty >= 1 && qty <= 4){
    price_set = 1;
}
else if (qty >= 5 && qty <= 9){
    price_set = 15;
}
else if (qty >= 10 && qty <= 14){
    price_set = 25;
}

//and so on...

console.log(r.price_array[price_set]); //this returns the value

is there a way to take a quantity of 3 and find the next lowest key match which would be 1? or quantity of 7 and find key 5?

share|improve this question
    
looping twice through all the elements of the array? First time to get the smallest and a second time to get the second smallest? –  Jeroen Ingelbrecht Aug 23 '13 at 19:48
    
Not an answer: There is a speed/space tradeoff possible if the max quantity is "reasonably small" by fully populating an array so that [1] [2] [3] [4] all contain 39.99 then if (quantity <= max) pricePerUnit = prices[quantity] –  Stephen P Aug 27 '13 at 0:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My version (tested, fiddle is here: http://jsfiddle.net/fred02138/UZTbJ/):

// assume keys in rprice object are sorted integers
function x(rprice, qty) {
    var prev = -1;
    var i;
    for (i in rprice) {
        var n = parseInt(i);
        if ((prev != -1) && (qty < n))
            return prev;
        else 
            prev = n;
    }    
}

var rprice = {
    1: 39.99,
    5: 24.99,
    10: 19.99
}

alert(x(rprice, 3));
alert(x(rprice, 7));
share|improve this answer
    
I tried each answer version.. This one worked consistently. –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 20:24
    
i passed the value onkeyup - x(r.price_array, $(this).val()); banging away on the num pad proved that the function was responding as expected with consistent matches to the next lowest key. –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 20:27
    
the last key in the array is 500.. when the user inputs 500 or more as the value i get undefined. I can not seem to figure out why. –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 21:07
    
I edited this answer but the edit was deleted. if the input is greater than the largest key this will return undefined. so alert(x(rprice, 11)); will not work. –  Smith Smithy Aug 27 '13 at 20:18

Sure - just use a loop:

var price_array = {
    1: 39.99,
    5: 24.99,
   10: 19.99,
   15: 15.99,
   20: 10.99,
   25:  5.99,
   30:  0.99
}
var qty = 12;

var maxKey = -1;
for (var key in price_array) {
    if (maxKey < 0 || key < qty) {
        maxKey = Math.max(maxKey, key);
    }
}
console.log(maxKey); //10
console.log(price_array[maxKey]); //19.99
share|improve this answer
    
qty of 1 returns maxKey = 0 (should be 1) and qty of 12 returns maxKey of 100 (should be 10) –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 19:56
    
@SmithSmithy Check my edit - it should work fine. –  h2ooooooo Aug 23 '13 at 19:59
    
checking... it almost works, but i am triggering with keyup on dynamic element so i am getting sporadic results. reworking the trigger. –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 20:07
    
How big is the list? I wouldn't think that any reasonable size list would cause any problem in an event handler. If it's really large, you might want to consider Paulpro's notion of a binary search. –  Scott Sauyet Aug 23 '13 at 20:08
1  
So linear search would be fine. There should be no reason to worry about looping through the list. –  Scott Sauyet Aug 23 '13 at 20:16

You can round to the nearest multiple of 5 using Math.round() and some simple division:

var price_array = {};
price_array[1] = 39.99;
price_array[5] = 24.99;
price_array[10] = 19.99;

function qty_round(qty) {
  // Math.max() is used to enforce a minimum quantity of 1
  return Math.max(1, 5 * Math.round(qty / 5));
}

console.log(price_array[qty_round(1)]);  // 39.99
console.log(price_array[qty_round(4)]);  // 24.99
console.log(price_array[qty_round(9)]);  // 19.99
console.log(price_array[qty_round(10)]); // 19.99

With some minor modifications you could round down instead of up (using Math.floor instead of Math.round) or enforce a maximum quantity.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you think there is a guarantee that all the thresholds are at multiples of five and that all multiples of five are thresholds? Why not 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, for instance? –  Scott Sauyet Aug 23 '13 at 20:01
    
Because that's the data provided in the question? Otherwise a loop is the way to go. –  leepowers Aug 23 '13 at 20:03
1  
They are not multiples of fives. after 25 it jumps to multiples of 25 then 50 after 100.. it could be anything really –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 20:03
1  
I think you'll have to use a loop instead. Even in the original data, only two of the three were multiples of 5. –  Scott Sauyet Aug 23 '13 at 20:07

Here's a function to do this. It expects to be used on objects with numeric keys like your array:

function getClosestKey(arr, target, u){
  if(arr.hasOwnProperty(target))
    return target;

  var keys = Object.keys(arr);
  keys.sort(function(a,b){ return a-b; });

  // Can replace linear scan with Binary search for O(log n) search
  // If you have a lot of keys that may be worthwhile
  for(var i = 0, prev; i < keys.length; i++){
    if(keys[i] > target)
      return prev === u ? u : +prev;
    prev = keys[i];
  }
  return +keys[i - 1];
}

You'll have to SHIM Object.keys in older browsers:

Object.keys = Object.keys || function(obj){
  var result = [];
  for(var key in obj)
    if(obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) result.push(key);
  return result;
}

Usage:

var price_array = [];
price_array[1] = 39.99;
price_array[5] = 24.99;
price_array[10] = 19.99;

getClosestKey(price_array, 0); // undefined
getClosestKey(price_array, 1); // 1
getClosestKey(price_array, 3); // 1
getClosestKey(price_array, 4); // 1
getClosestKey(price_array, 5); // 5
getClosestKey(price_array, 7); // 5
getClosestKey(price_array, 9); // 5
getClosestKey(price_array, 10); // 10
getClosestKey(price_array, 100); // 10
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, but what is u –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 20:16
    
@SmithSmithy It's undefined. No argument is passed in for it, so it becomes undefined. That's useful in old browsers where undefined could actually be overwritten, as well as just for a shorthand. –  Paulpro Aug 23 '13 at 20:17
    
@SmithSmithy It's just a handy way to return undefined when the target is lower than the smallest key. –  Paulpro Aug 23 '13 at 20:20
    
Thank you. I was getting inconsistent results for some reason... I don't know if it is the way i was triggering the function with jquery keyup or what.. I went with fred's answer... Thank you for the help –  Smith Smithy Aug 23 '13 at 20:28
    
@SmithSmithy Maybe. It may have been before some edits. I made a lot of edits to it haha. I kept noticing mistakes. It should be consistent now. –  Paulpro Aug 23 '13 at 20:29

Another approach, demonstrated in this Fiddle:

var lowerKeyFinder = function(prices) {
    var keys = Object.keys(prices);
    keys.sort(function(a, b) {return a - b;});

    return function(val) {
        var maxKey = -1;
        for (var i = 0, len = keys.length; i < len; i++) {
            if (maxKey < 0 || keys[i] < val) {
                maxKey = Math.max(maxKey, keys[i]);
            }
        }
        return maxKey;
    };
};

var lookup = lowerKeyFinder(r.price_array);

lookup(3);  //=> 1
lookup(7);  //=> 5

This does not insist that the keys are initially presented in order, but sorts them once. It builds on the answer from @h2ooooooo but works a bit differently as it just offers in the end a simple function to look up by quantity.

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