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This seems to work:

function callLoop (n) {
  function caller () {
    console.log("hello from " + n);
    setTimeout(function () {
      caller();
    }, 10000);
  }

  caller();
}

for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  callLoop(i);
}

setTimeout, in this example, would instead be a long-running network call. Is this the "correct" way to parallelize these network calls?

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check out this question –  miah Aug 23 '13 at 19:56

1 Answer 1

Check out async.parallel:

var async = require( 'async' );

function callLoop (n) {
  function caller () {
    console.log("hello from " + n);
    setTimeout(function () {
      caller();
    }, 10000);
  }

  caller();
}

var functions = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  functions.push(callLoop.bind(null, i));
}

async.parallel(functions);
share|improve this answer
    
the example you have will terminate, whereas my example will not (this is what I want). Also, i'm not looping for the sake of an example, I actually want to execute the same code multiple times. And finally, I don't care about "synchronizing" them (i.e. waiting for them to all finish) and then doing something. –  quinn Aug 23 '13 at 21:50
    
As far as "synchronizing", the last callback is optional. The first argument is an array of functions, which you could construct with your for loop. –  fakewaffle Aug 23 '13 at 22:12
    
I updated the code. Let me know if that is what you were thinking. –  fakewaffle Aug 23 '13 at 22:19

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