Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a huge array (up to 9,000 characters) which I want to save in my MYSQL database. I am going to encode it as a JSON using json_encode().

I am trying to determine the best data type in which to save it. From the MYSQL documentation from what I understand, row memory limits are 65,535 bytes, with varchar being able to be up to 65,535 bytes itself. So at most my 9,000 character JSON string could at most takeup 27,000 bytes with 3 characters per byte leaving me well under the 65k limit for the entire row.

With this information I am led to believe varchar(9,000) should do the trick, but I am a novice so I am not sure.

Can I use varchar(9,000) to save my JSON string or would there be a more efficient data type?

Thanks.

*Note: This JSON information is dynamic, and text based, creating files and reading / writing to them is not a option, I really want to accomplish this within MYSQL's limits.

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you want such data in MySql? Have you considered using MongoDB? –  Hrishi Aug 23 '13 at 19:59
3  
I suggest TEXT... –  user1646111 Aug 23 '13 at 20:01
    
I am unfamiliar with MongoDB, I will have to look into it. Why do you suggest MongoDB over MYSQL for this application? As suggested by Timur I will have to look into TEXT and BLOB. Thanks. –  Ronburgundy Aug 23 '13 at 20:04
    
Dynamic, text based and JSON - so I suggested MongoDB. MongoDB is meant for data that has those properties. So I suggested MongoDB. But you must be careful when choosing the DB. If you want relational joins, and have a relational data model, Mongo doesn't give that to you. –  Hrishi Aug 23 '13 at 20:07
    
My schema is certainly relationally based. IE: users will have characters, and characters will have these huge 9,000 char length JSON strings. –  Ronburgundy Aug 23 '13 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would personally try to store JSON file on the server, but to answer your question TEXT and BLOB will be your best choice, VARCHAR is fast, but not when there are many characters

share|improve this answer
    
My problem is that there are going to be (our assumption) 10,000 users on the site, and each user will have atleast one of these 9,000 char arrays associated to them. –  Ronburgundy Aug 23 '13 at 20:02
    
I will look into BLOB and TEXT, thanks. –  Ronburgundy Aug 23 '13 at 20:03
1  
if it's to be stored server side, and it's already in JSON, TEXT is the better of the two choices...BLOB is more designed for binary data (hence, Binary Large OBject) –  user2366842 Aug 23 '13 at 20:05

You should probably also consider if it's a good idea to store all of this data in JSON inside of a database in the first place. Do you really want to have to retrieve and parse the entire 9000 char JSON string every time you want to look at one piece? Then if you want to modify once piece you have to re-encode and re-store all of the data.

If these JSON strings are needed anything less than infrequently I would suggest breaking your data into actual tables and fields and and retrieving/setting only the bits you need for a given request.

share|improve this answer
    
Retrieving the information and decoding it will happen thousands of times a minute. ie: as users visit the site the site is populated with this information. Essentially on any given page load up to 100 of these records would have to be retrieved and decoded and then displayed. But, these records would only be encoded and written to the database once every 24 hours. Yet, still tens of thousands of the records would have to be encoded and saved. I have considered your suggestion of numerous fields and tables instead of one giant field. I may have to look more into that. –  Ronburgundy Aug 23 '13 at 20:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.