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The data here is for a bank account with a running balance. I want to resample the data to only use the end of day balance, so the last value given for a day. There can be multiple data points for a day, representing multiple transactions.

In [1]: from StringIO import StringIO

In [2]: import pandas as pd

In [3]: import numpy as np

In [4]: print "Pandas version", pd.__version__
Pandas version 0.12.0

In [5]: print "Numpy version", np.__version__
Numpy version 1.7.1

In [6]: data_string = StringIO(""""Date","Balance"
   ...: "08/09/2013","1000"
   ...: "08/09/2013","950"
   ...: "08/09/2013","930"
   ...: "08/06/2013","910"
   ...: "08/02/2013","900"
   ...: "08/01/2013","88"
   ...: "08/01/2013","87"
   ...: """)

In [7]: ts = pd.read_csv(data_string, parse_dates=[0], index_col=0)

In [8]: print ts
            Balance
Date               
2013-08-09     1000
2013-08-09      950
2013-08-09      930
2013-08-06      910
2013-08-02      900
2013-08-01       88
2013-08-01       87

I expect "2013-08-09" to be 1000, but definitely not the 'middle' number 950.

In [10]: ts.Balance.resample('D', how='last')
Out[10]: 
Date
2013-08-01     88
2013-08-02    900
2013-08-03    NaN
2013-08-04    NaN
2013-08-05    NaN
2013-08-06    910
2013-08-07    NaN
2013-08-08    NaN
2013-08-09    950
Freq: D, dtype: float64

I expect "2013-08-09" to be 930, or "2013-08-01" to be 88.

In [12]: ts.Balance.resample('D', how='first')
Out[12]: 
Date
2013-08-01      87
2013-08-02     900
2013-08-03     NaN
2013-08-04     NaN
2013-08-05     NaN
2013-08-06     910
2013-08-07     NaN
2013-08-08     NaN
2013-08-09    1000
Freq: D, dtype: float64

Am I missing something here? Does resampling with 'first' and 'last' not work the way I'm expecting it to?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To be able to resample your data Pandas first have to sort it. So if you load your data and sort it by index you get the following thing:

>>> pd.read_csv(data_string, parse_dates=[0], index_col=0).sort_index()
            Balance
Date               
2013-08-01       87
2013-08-01       88
2013-08-02      900
2013-08-06      910
2013-08-09     1000
2013-08-09      930
2013-08-09      950

Which explains why you got the results you got. @Jeff explained why the order is "arbitrary" and according to your comment the solution is to use mergesort algorithm on the data before the operations...

>>> df = pd.read_csv(data_string, parse_dates=[0],
                     index_col=0).sort_index(kind='mergesort')
>>> df.Balance.resample('D',how='last')
2013-08-01      88
2013-08-02     900
2013-08-03     NaN
2013-08-04     NaN
2013-08-05     NaN
2013-08-06     910
2013-08-07     NaN
2013-08-08     NaN
2013-08-09    1000
>>> df.Balance.resample('D', how='first')
2013-08-01     87
2013-08-02    900
2013-08-03    NaN
2013-08-04    NaN
2013-08-05    NaN
2013-08-06    910
2013-08-07    NaN
2013-08-08    NaN
2013-08-09    930
share|improve this answer
    
a sort on duplicates is arbitrary (e.g. no guarantees from merge or quick sort), IIRC –  Jeff Aug 23 '13 at 20:48
    
@Jeff I thought that was the case. But it would be a really nice feature if Pandas could recognise (on read) that the data is already sorted (like in this case) and just use that sort order. :) Yes I know... It's an "I wan't a pony" request :) –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 23 '13 at 20:54
    
pls put a request on github; I don't know how tricky this is (its in the group index calcs) –  Jeff Aug 23 '13 at 21:01
    
This answer lead me to the solution, which is to use .sort_index(kind='heapsort') because heapsort is a stable sort algorithm, meaning that the original order will be preserved. Can you edit your answer to include this? –  Grant Aug 23 '13 at 21:24
    
@Jeff is this really a stabile solution? If it is then there is no need for the github issue. –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 23 '13 at 21:27

The problem is since your dates are dups there can effectively be an arbitrary order; ordering with dups is not guaranteed.

In [24]: ts.Balance.resample('D',how='last')
Out[24]: 
Date
2013-08-01     87
2013-08-02    900
2013-08-03    NaN
2013-08-04    NaN
2013-08-05    NaN
2013-08-06    910
2013-08-07    NaN
2013-08-08    NaN
2013-08-09    930
Freq: D, dtype: float64

In [25]: ts.Balance.order().resample('D',how='last')
Out[25]: 
Date
2013-08-01      88
2013-08-02     900
2013-08-03     NaN
2013-08-04     NaN
2013-08-05     NaN
2013-08-06     910
2013-08-07     NaN
2013-08-08     NaN
2013-08-09    1000
Freq: D, dtype: float64

Easiest way is to sort the data, but it is not clear what the ordering actually is (e.g. you need an exogenous parameter here to decide it).

pass sort=False to a groupby (you can't do this with resample though)

In [29]: ts.groupby(ts.index,sort=False).last().reindex(date_range(ts.index.min(),ts.index.max()))
Out[29]: 
            Balance
2013-08-01       87
2013-08-02      900
2013-08-03      NaN
2013-08-04      NaN
2013-08-05      NaN
2013-08-06      910
2013-08-07      NaN
2013-08-08      NaN
2013-08-09      930

You can do it this way to get exactly what you are after

In [52]: df = DataFrame(ts.values,index=ts.index,columns=['values']).reset_index()

In [53]: df
Out[53]: 
                 Date  values
0 2013-08-09 00:00:00    1000
1 2013-08-09 00:00:00     950
2 2013-08-09 00:00:00     930
3 2013-08-06 00:00:00     910
4 2013-08-02 00:00:00     900
5 2013-08-01 00:00:00      88
6 2013-08-01 00:00:00      87

In [54]: df.groupby('Date').apply(lambda x: x.iloc[-1]['values']).reindex(date_range(ts.index.min(),ts.index.max()))

Out[54]: 
2013-08-01     87
2013-08-02    900
2013-08-03    NaN
2013-08-04    NaN
2013-08-05    NaN
2013-08-06    910
2013-08-07    NaN
2013-08-08    NaN
2013-08-09    930
Freq: D, dtype: float64
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