Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very interesting scenario where I would like a class to inform another entity it has been destroyed; however, its not doing what I want it too.

The Problem

The deconstructor, for some reason does not do what its supposed to do.

The Question

Why is the destructor not being invoked and make sure that it does do its necessary clean up.

The Code

So here we have the informer ~

class Connection 
{
   public const int Port = 50000;// Can be any range between 49152 and 65536

    //Teh Constructor
    public Boolean Connect()
    {
        //SetInformation
        Information.Id = 545;

        using (var WebServ = new ClientSDKSoapClient("ClientSDKSoap"))
        {
            ContinueConnection.WaitOne();
            WebServ.ClientLogin(Information);
        }
        return true;
    }

    ~Connection()
    {
        using (var WebServ = new ClientSDKSoapClient("ClientSDKSoap"))
        {
            WebServ.ClientLogout(Information);
        }
    }
}

Additional Information

I want the web service to record if the Connection Class is destroyed for any given reason. When the client is connecting, it works perfectly. The Web Service records every method called from it. If I call ClientLogout explicitly, it will work.

I am aware I can implement IDisposable; however, this object is not intended to be used within the lifetime of one method. In fact, its intended for use for the entire duration of the program and the failure of this object basically results in the failure of the entire project. (Although I suppose main IS a method...)

I need to release a network connection; however, its not in this program, its in another program and unless ClientLogout is called, it won't be released.

My Research

Microsoft says that you should use the deconstructor for the release of unmanaged resources making an explicit reference to network connections. This ones got my quite stumped.

share|improve this question
    
Can you show the code where you allocate/initialize the object and then point out where you expect it to be GC'd? –  evanmcdonnal Aug 23 '13 at 20:59
7  
My suggestion is to use IDisposable rather than a destructor. The destructor happens whenever the garbage collector wants to get rid of it. Wrapping your object in a using will make it run the dispose when it leaves the using. –  gunr2171 Aug 23 '13 at 21:00
    
Agreed on using IDisposable. stackoverflow.com/questions/4898733/… –  Mike Precup Aug 23 '13 at 21:03
1  
You are actually using C# objects and not directly handling unmanaged resources. –  François Moisan Aug 23 '13 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should implement a Dispose pattern for your Connection class, rather than relying on an obscure deconstructor metaphor. This would be the "canonical" way to do it.

public class Connection : IDisposable  // <== Inherit from IDisposable interface
{
    public const int Port = 50000;// Can be any range between 49152 and 65536

    private SomeType webserv; // Use whatever real type is appropriate here.
    private Information information = new Information();  // or whatever

    // This is a real constructor.
    public Connection()
    {
        //SetInformation
        information.Id = 545;

        webServ = new ClientSDKSoapClient("ClientSDKSoap"))
        webserv.ContinueConnection.WaitOne();
        webServ.ClientLogin(information);
    }

    // Implement IDisposable interface
    public void Dispose()
    {
        webServ.ClientLogout(information);
    }
}

And then use it thusly

using (var connection = new Connection())
{
    // Use the connection here.
}

The client will be logged out when you leave the using block.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I took so long to mark this correctly~ I realized that my problem was caused by a potential failure on my part in regards to designing. I've fixed it now and I think it will mark a lot more sense to future people managing my code. Thanks a lot. –  Aelphaeis Aug 26 '13 at 14:14

Microsoft says that you should use the deconstructor for the release of unmanaged resources making an explicit reference to network connections. This ones got my quite stumped.

The docs here are misleading. What they really means is that, somewhere in your object inheritance chain, you need a finalizer to ensure that your unmanaged resources is appropriately cleaned up. But you only need this finalizer once for the entire inheritance tree.

As an example, if you build a class for a data access layer the wraps the SqlConnection object, you do not need a destructor or finalizer, because the core SqlConnection type already has one. What you should do, though, is implement IDisposable and write code that ensures prompt disposal, so that the finalizer on your SqlConnection will be called sooner, rather than later.

In this case, ClientSDKSoap type already has a destructor, you do not need to write another.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.