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I've been investigating some performance issues for an Event Viewer application that we have on our development site when I noticed an interesting issue in the algorithm. I then created a simplified test project to test two different algorithms. This program basically retrieves Windows Event Logs using the EventLog class, and then translates those logs into queryable EventLogItem entities.

This operation is performed and timed using two different loops. The first (backward) loop starts at the index of the last item in the list, translates the item and then decreases the index. The method is defined like this:

private static void TranslateLogsUsingBackwardLoop()
{
    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopwatch.Start();

    var originalLogs = EventLog.GetEventLogs();
    var translatedLogs = new List<EventLogItem>();

    Parallel.ForEach<EventLog>(originalLogs, currentLog =>
    {
        for (int index = currentLog.Entries.Count - 1; index >= 0; index--)
        {
            var currentEntry = currentLog.Entries[index];

            EventLogItem translatedEntry = new EventLogItem
            {
                MachineName = currentEntry.MachineName,
                LogName = currentLog.LogDisplayName,
                CreatedTime = currentEntry.TimeGenerated,
                Source = currentEntry.Source,
                Message = currentEntry.Message,
                Number = currentEntry.Index,
                Category = currentEntry.Category,
                Type = currentEntry.EntryType,
                InstanceID = currentEntry.InstanceId,
                User = currentEntry.UserName,
            };

            lock (translatedLogs)
            {
                translatedLogs.Add(translatedEntry);
            }
        }
    });

    stopwatch.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine("{0} logs were translated in {1} using backward loop.", translatedLogs.Count, stopwatch.Elapsed);
}

The second (forward) loop starts at index 0 and increments the index. This method is defined like this:

private static void TranslateLogsUsingForwardLoop()
{
    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopwatch.Start();

    var originalLogs = EventLog.GetEventLogs();
    var translatedLogs = new List<EventLogItem>();

    Parallel.ForEach<EventLog>(originalLogs, currentLog =>
    {
        for (int index = 0; index < currentLog.Entries.Count; index++)
        {
            var currentEntry = currentLog.Entries[index];

            EventLogItem translatedEntry = new EventLogItem
            {
                MachineName = currentEntry.MachineName,
                LogName = currentLog.LogDisplayName,
                CreatedTime = currentEntry.TimeGenerated,
                Source = currentEntry.Source,
                Message = currentEntry.Message,
                Number = currentEntry.Index,
                Category = currentEntry.Category,
                Type = currentEntry.EntryType,
                InstanceID = currentEntry.InstanceId,
                User = currentEntry.UserName,
            };

            lock (translatedLogs)
            {
                translatedLogs.Add(translatedEntry);
            }
        }
    });

    stopwatch.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine("{0} logs were translated in {1} using forward loop.", translatedLogs.Count, stopwatch.Elapsed);
}

And the main method:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    TranslateLogsUsingForwardLoop();
    Console.WriteLine();
    Thread.Sleep(2000);
    TranslateLogsUsingBackwardLoop();
    Console.ReadLine();
}

This is what I get (performed this test several times, and results are almost identical):

enter image description here

Note that the server I tested this on logs to the Event Log every second, that's why the number of translated logs are not the same. So why is the backward loop faster? I initially thought it's because in the backward loop algorithm, currentLog.Entries.Count is evaluated just once, where as in the forward loop it needs to be calculated and compared against index on every loop iteration, but then again that doesn't seem right. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Two comments. When timing always include a burn-in loop. Do some work before the timing starts in order to get the processors warmed up (throttled correctly). And you should start the timer right before the For loop and not time the assignment operators. –  ja72 Aug 24 '13 at 14:09
    
How many entries are there in your tests? Also have you tried with regular (sequential) loop? –  ja72 Aug 24 '13 at 14:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Testing againt 0 versus the maxndex is likely to have little effect. However, performing test1 then test2 shortly thereafter often has an effect due to processor caching and/or O/S page caching. You might reverse the test1/test2 to see if forwards magically becomes faster than backwards. Accurate profiling is hard on modern achitectures.

OK, so Backwards is still Faster when executed first. Not my first guess, but since you are using Parallel and lock, there is perhaps an interaction between the locking method and the difference between forward and backward looping.

Maybe the backwards loop just happens to work better with processor branch prediction (again may interact with parallism, processor cache, etc.).

Lots of tight loops in multi-thread code have weird interactions with memory management because of locking overhead. -- It is not even uncommon for the multi-thread solution to be slower because of lock contention

You can try running without parallel both forward and back to see if time becomes more even -- but at best you would only determine it to be likely / unlikely relation to parallel interactions or lock contention. Profiling your code may be suggestive, but it may may not procide a definite answer either. A definitive answer can be quite difficult for this situation (I assumed you were mostly in curious/learning mode).

share|improve this answer
    
I tried reversing the call order. Backwards is still faster. –  PoweredByOrange Aug 23 '13 at 21:30
    
I don't see that much difference between the two algorithms when I use a regular loop instead of a parallel loop... Still not quite sure why it's behaving like this. –  PoweredByOrange Aug 26 '13 at 17:19
    
Acutally, that is the key to the answer. If the performance is basically same forward & backwards it is almost sure to be either an interaction with memory management locking, or some other locking behaviour. Rooting out the exact nature of the interation would be quite difficult as well as depending upon your environment. –  Gary Walker Aug 29 '13 at 17:41

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