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(Edited down from a big wall o' text to better sum up) The problem is thus:

I have a collection of AbstractMyClass. There are a number of concrete child classes in this collection. Each child class will also contain a field for a particular type of object. There could be a dozen different children of AbstractMyClass, each with their own object field. Each of these objects likely has no shared parent class outside of Object.

For example, MyClassA may have a String, MyClassB may have an Integer, MyClassC may have a MyCustomClass, etc. The different objects are an unfortunate necessity in the way this is done.

The thing is, this collection needs to be evaluated and, given the right set of conditions, the object(s) within the AbstractMyClass must be extracted, examined, manipulated, stored, set aside, etc for later operations. There are a variety of potential operations based on conditions as well as the MyClass/object type within, operations such that handling the data within the MyClass may not be viable as other, more centralized classes (ie, a class managing a thread pool) may need to deal with them. That leaves me with the need to handle some very disparate object types. This can certainly be done, but I cannot think of any reasonably clean or dynamic way to handle it. Sure, you could try the following:

  • Use Generics, which can eliminate some child classes, but outside of that class, you don't know what Object T is or how to handle it without more muckery.
  • Typecheck everything, which makes a rather lengthy and ugly conditional, and must be maintained if new object types are introduced.
  • Delegates within AbstractMyClass, but that means even more classes to build up to handle each instance, and delegates may not be able to handle all of the necessary functions.
  • A wrapper object with a field for every object type. Yay, let's nullcheck everything.

You can see the predicament. Is there any "good" way to handle this sort of thing, or is it just one of those issues that Java can't directly handle as it may not have enough info at runtime and everyone just works around it in varying ways?

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1 Answer 1

It's hard to answer without a concrete example without knowing exactly what you must do with the response, but there are basically two clean, OO solutions that I see.

First solution: Good old polymorphism:

public void handleResponse(AbstractResponse response) {
    response.handle();
}

In short, the Response is itself responsible for its handling when it has been received. The response knows its own type, and has access to its own data.

Second solution: the visitor pattern, which allows externalizing the response handling without doing instanceof checks and casts to know the type of the response:

public interface ResponseVisitor {
    void visitA(ResponseA responseA);
    void visitB(ResponseB responseB);
}

public abstract class AbstractResponse {
    public abstract void accept(ResponseVisitor visitor);
    ...
}

public class ResponseA extends AbstractResponse {
    @Override
    public void accept(ResponseVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visitA(this);
    }
}

public class ResponseB extends AbstractResponse {
    @Override
    public void accept(ResponseVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visitB(this);
    }
}

public class TheResponseVisitorImplementation implements ResponseVisitor {
    @Override
    public void visitA(ResponseA responseA) {
        ...
    }

    @Override
    public void visitB(ResponseB responseB) {
        ...
    }
}

...

public void handleResponse(AbstractResponse response) {
    ResponseVisitor visitor = new TheResponseVisitorImplementation();
    response.accept(visitor);
}
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The first is basically delegating actions to the response, but I think that can only accomplish so much as other classes may still need to be aware of those objects and how to best handle them, ie, tucking the objects into a "to do" list of sorts for inclusion in a thread pool at a later time, among other things. The visitor is interesting, but may still suffer from the same malady: Things can be handled, but if that data needs to be stored for later use/manipulation by other classes then you may still run into the same issue. Of course, I may be overcomplicating this whole thing... –  user1017413 Aug 23 '13 at 21:59

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