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After reading this documentation: http://es5.github.io/#x4.2.1

I was confused by the two prototype references on CF, and by this statement:

The property named CFP1 in CFp is shared by cf1, cf2, cf3, cf4, and cf5 (but not by CF)

Much of the literature on Javascript points out that functions are first class objects, and as such I'd expect to be able to set their implicit prototype reference like an object to achieve prototypal inheritance (disclaimer: I don't actually know what I'd use this inheritance for, but it occurred to me to see if it's possible). Can I set this implicit prototype on a function, or will it always point to Function.prototype (I'm assuming that's the default). And why does Function have both explicit and implicit prototypes? Also do any other types in Javascript have both explicit and implicit prototype references or is Function unique in this regard?

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Okay, I completely rewrote my answer trying to focus on what I believe you're missing. It was hard to decide what to leave out, but detailing everything would require too much space and time. I hope the new answer helps! –  bfavaretto Aug 24 '13 at 4:32
    
@bfavaretto Thank you!! Reading it now and will leave any feedback on your answer. –  James Cadd Aug 26 '13 at 18:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Consider the diagram from the specification, and the code below it, which tries to reproduce what's going on:

enter image description here

function CF() {};            // the constructor
CF.P1 = 'foo';               // P1 is an own property of the constructor; P2 is the same
var CFp = { CRP1: 'bar' };   // for now, just an object, with a CRP1 property
CF.prototype = CFp           // set CFp as the 'explicit prototype property' of CF;
                             // only constructors have such a property
var cf1 = new CF();          // an instance; 
var cf2 = new CF();          // another instance; cf3..cf5 are constructed the same way
Object.getPrototypeOf(cf1);  // CFp; this is the 'implicit prototype link' from cf1 to CFp;
                             // put another way, CFp became the [[Prototype]] of cf1

You said you were confused by this sentence: the property named CFP1 in CFp is shared by cf1, cf2, cf3, cf4, and cf5 (but not by CF). Consider this:

cf1.CRP1;   // 'bar' - found on CFp through cf1
cf2.CRP1;   // 'bar' - found on CFp through cf2
CF.CRP1;    // undefined

So what that sentence means that you can access the contents of CRP1 from cf1..cf5, but not from the constructor CF (remember, functions/constructors are objects too, thus they can have properties). And that's because CFp (the "owner" of CRP1) is not the [[Prototype]] of CF, it's just the value pointed by the CF.prototype property. The prototype property only exist in function objects, and is used solely to define the [[Prototype]] of instances created by invocations of the function is invoked as a constructor (like in new CF()). The fact that both [[Prototype]] and prototype read as "prototype" is the source of great confusion – and maybe part of what is confusing you; hopefully, it's less confusing now. With that in mind, I'll try to shortly answer your other questions.

Much of the literature on Javascript points out that functions are first class objects, and as such I'd expect to be able to set their implicit prototype reference like an object to achieve prototypal inheritance [...].

There is no way to directly set the implicit prototype reference (or [[Prototype]]) of an existing object, except for the non-standard __proto__ property. What you can do is create new objects with a given [[Prototype]]. You can do that with var obj = new ConstructorFunction(), where the [[Prototype]] of obj is ConstructorFunction.prototype, or with var obj = Object.create(someOtherObj), where the [[Prototype]] of obj is someOtherObj.

Can I set this implicit prototype on a function, or will it always point to Function.prototype (I'm assuming that's the default).

Only with __proto__.

And why does Function have both explicit and implicit prototypes? Also do any other types in Javascript have both explicit and implicit prototype references or is Function unique in this regard?

Function ("the Function constructor") is just a function, and as any other function it has a prototype property; it's also an object, and as (almost) any other object is has a [[Prototype]] object. There are standard constructors for other types too, like Object, String, Array, Boolean, Number. They're all functions, and have both a prototype and a [[Prototype]].

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A couple more to follow, but my first question is with regards to: "// set CFp as the 'explicit prototype property' of CF; only constructors have such a property." My understanding is that JS doesn't have an explicit way to differentiate between constructor and standard functions, which is why constructor functions are capitalized by convention. Would it be true to say that all functions have an explicit prototype property, but it generally goes unused on non-constructor functions? –  James Cadd Aug 26 '13 at 18:42
    
Yes, exactly! All functions are (potential) constructors, and they all have a .prototype property. –  bfavaretto Aug 26 '13 at 19:22
    
Ok, final bit - is it true that the function type's implicit [[Prototype]] defaults to Function.prototype, and that modifying Function.prototype will affect all functions? If that's so then I would think that functions can in fact be extended through prototypal inheritance, however all function instances must be extended in the same fashion (eg, there's no such thing as "prototypal instances of functions"). Apologize if I'm butchering the terminology! –  James Cadd Aug 26 '13 at 21:45
    
Meant to say "prototypal classes of functions" above. –  James Cadd Aug 26 '13 at 21:51
    
@JamesCadd Yes, modifying Function.prototype does add new methods to all function objects (one example would be a shim to Function.prototype.bind). What you can't do is overwrite/replace Function.prototype. So every function you create (using a function declaration, a function expression or new Function()) will inherit from the default Function.prototype. Not sure what you mean by "prototypal classes of functions", though. –  bfavaretto Aug 26 '13 at 22:00

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