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I'm learning C and trying to write a very simple program. Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>

int[] getNumbers( int x, int y, int z );

int main() {
    int[] theNumbers = getNumbers(5,6,7);
    return 0;
}

int[] getNumbers( int x, int y, int z) {
    int[] numbers = { x, y, z };
    return numbers;
}

I can't figure out what my issue is.

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1  
You also can't return arrays in C. –  chris Aug 24 '13 at 0:55
    
Returning reference of a local variable. Booooom. –  Mahesh Aug 24 '13 at 0:55
3  
I think you need to look at a C programming manual. What you've written isn't C. –  lurker Aug 24 '13 at 0:58
3  
You really cannot make those kinds assumptions. Every language has their own rules. Some just happen to look similar and have similar rules, but you need to look at the language definition to know where they are and where they aren't. –  lurker Aug 24 '13 at 1:04
1  
Heh heh, you'll quickly run into all sorts of (sometimes subtle) problems if you code like Java. –  chris Aug 24 '13 at 1:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's an example approach that works in C. There are probably better approaches, but it's unclear what the actual goals are. This just illustrates some ways of handling what you were trying to do, but in working C. C is going to be more rigid and explicit than a language like Java. Java just happens to have taken some syntax from C/C++.

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct { int a[3]; } int_array;

int_array getNumbers( int x, int y, int z );

int main() {
    int_array theNumbers = getNumbers(5,6,7);
    printf( "%d, %d, %d\n", theNumbers.a[0], theNumbers.a[1], theNumbers.a[2] );
    return 0;
}

int_array getNumbers( int x, int y, int z) {
    int_array numbers = { x, y, z };
    return numbers;
}
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No real goal, I was just trying to get a feel for the language and the error made no sense to me. Thanks for the sample code! –  inquisitor Aug 24 '13 at 1:12
    
@inquisitor That's cool. What I was trying to say, somewhat vaguely, is that how you approach it will depend upon the bigger context. There have been good alternative examples posted by others to your question. –  lurker Aug 24 '13 at 1:15

This is how you declare an array in C:

int a[SIZE];

[The example you posted is how C# and java declares arrays]

Also, as others have noted, there are several issues with your posted code:

  • You can't return an array in C (only a pointer to an array or struct)
  • You should not return references to local variables (use malloc() instead)
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In C we cannot return an array, but we can return an array pointer.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int* getNumbers(int x, int y, int z)
{
    int *num_arr     = malloc(3 * sizeof(int));
    *(num_arr)       = x;
    *(num_arr + 1)   = y;
    *(num_arr + 2)   = z;

    return num_arr;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int *a;
    a = getNumbers(5, 6, 7);

    // printf("%d %d %d\n", a[0], a[1], a[2]);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but you're not returning an array pointer; you're returning a pointer to int that happens to point to the first element of an array (which is generally what you want). And your element assignments could be written num_arr[0] = x; num_arr[1] = y; num_arr[2] = z; –  Keith Thompson Aug 24 '13 at 1:30
    
I made a mistake? But how to return an array pointer in C? Or In C we cannot return array pointer, but only return a pointer to an array? –  x5lcfd Aug 25 '13 at 7:45
1  
An "array pointer" and a "pointer to an array" are the same thing. You can have a pointer to an array, such as int (*p)[10];, but most array accesses are done via pointers to the elements of the array rather than pointers to the entire array. –  Keith Thompson Aug 25 '13 at 8:45

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