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A char** always confuses me. The following code generates a segmentation fault. Explain please...

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    char** nameList;
    nameList = malloc(4*sizeof(char*));
    nameList[0] = malloc(12); //not sure if needed but doesn't work either
    nameList[0] = "Hello "; 
    printf("%s  ",nameList[0]);// even this statement isn't executed
    strcat(nameList[0], "World");
    printf("%s ",nameList[0]);
    return 0;
}
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Keep in mind malloc doesn't zero the memory or anything. –  chris Aug 24 '13 at 1:00
    
zero the memory means? –  BlueFlame Aug 24 '13 at 1:01
    
Fill it with 0s (which, if you'll remember, are the value of null characters). –  chris Aug 24 '13 at 1:03
    
You mean I've to add a '\0' character manually to the end? –  BlueFlame Aug 24 '13 at 1:06
    
Use calloc instead of malloc –  James Aug 24 '13 at 1:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code exhibits undefined behavior by writing to read-only storage, and also attempting to write past the end of it.

Your malloc idea was a step in the right direction. However, you should use strcpy to copy "Hello" into the newly allocated memory. In addition, you need to consider the size of the string that you are planning to append, and the null terminator when calculating the size of the dynamic allocation.

Obviously, you also need to free all your allocated memory at the end of your program:

char** nameList;
nameList = malloc(4*sizeof(char*));
nameList[0] = malloc(12);
strcpy(nameList[0], "Hello ");
printf("%s  ",nameList[0]);
strcat(nameList[0], "World"); // You were strcat-ing into a wrong element
printf("%s ",nameList[0]);
free(nameList[0]);
free(nameList);

Demo on ideone.

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need to free or should free? –  BlueFlame Aug 24 '13 at 1:23
    
This works, but why nameList[0] = "Hello" fails? –  BlueFlame Aug 24 '13 at 1:29
    
And is there a way to keep concatenating to a single single and keep increasing it's length on the go? In my real project, I don't know the length of nameList[i] strings beforehand... –  BlueFlame Aug 24 '13 at 1:31
1  
@BlueFlame The nameList[0] = "Hello" fails because it replaces the pointer to the allocated dynamic memory with a constant "string" memory. You can't strcat into that memory, because it's read-only. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 24 '13 at 1:33
1  
@BlueFlame You can expand the string as you go by calling realloc on it, passing the new size. For example, to append "XYZ" to "Hello World" that you have there you'd need to call NameList[0] = realloc(NameList[0], strlen(NameList[0])+strlen("XYZ")+1). After that you'd be able to strcat into the re-allocated space. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 24 '13 at 1:36

After nameList = malloc(4*sizeof(char*)); you have: nameList[0] = trash nameList[1] = trash nameList[2] = trash nameList[3] = trash

After nameList[0] = "Hello "; you have nameList[0] = "Hello" nameList[1] = trash nameList[2] = trash nameList[3] = trash

So when you do strcat(nameList[1], "World"); it's very likely you'll get a segfault, because nameList[1] can point to anywhere in memory.

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oops, I meant to keep nameList[0] instead of nameList[1]. the edited code generates the same error. –  BlueFlame Aug 24 '13 at 1:16
    
@BlueFlame see dasblinkenlight's answer, that's the one that will help you. :) –  José X. Aug 24 '13 at 1:18

Before using double ptrs, get code that uses a single ptr to work. Also, you don't want to "overprogram" simple code. However, if you want to program the usage of a double ptr, start with this code and modify to use double ptrs.

int main()
{
        char *nameList;

        nameList = malloc(12);   // point nameList to 12 bytes of storage

        strncpy(nameList, "Hello \0", 7);
        printf("%s\n",nameList);   // notice no space, its already after hello

        strncat(nameList, "World", 5);
        printf("%s\n",nameList);

        free(nameList);

        return 0;
}
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