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All the LESS documentation and tutorials use #namespace > .mixin() syntax when it takes into namespaces. However I find myself to be more comfortable with .namespace.mixin() syntax, i.e.:

.namespace() {
    .mixin() {
        foo: bar;
    }
}

#usage {.namespace.mixin()}

Am I missing something? Is there ANY difference between these two variants (in partucular, the way a mixins/variables affect scope and vice versa)? Or is it just some kind of a historically rooted tradition?


You're right, ".namespace > .mixin", ".namespace.mixin" and ".namespace .mixin" are different beasts when they are used as selectors. But things seem to be dissimilar when it goes to mixin invoke/expansion. I cannot craft an example where:

"#usage {#namespace > .mixing}"
"#usage {#namespace.mixing}"
"#usage {#namespace .mixing}"

etc. produce non equal output, assuming .mixin is defined as parametric ruleset. Same for ".namespace". E.g.:

/* A */
#namespace {
    .mixin1() {
        foo1: bar;
        .mixin1() {
            foo2: bar;
        }
    }

    .someruleset {
        foo3: bar;
        .mixin1 {
            foo4: bar;
        }
    }
}

/* 1 */
#u1 {#namespace > .mixin1()}
/* 2 */
#u2 {#namespace .mixin1()}
/* 3 */
#u3 {#namespace.mixin1}
/* 4 */
#u4 {#namespace .mixin1}
/* 5 */
#u5 {#namespace.mixin1.mixin1()}
/* 6 */
#u6 {#namespace.someruleset.mixin1()}

/* B */
.namespace {
    .mixin1() {
        foo1: bar;
        .mixin1() {
            foo2: bar;
        }
    }

    .someruleset {
        foo3: bar;
        .mixin1 {
            foo4: bar;
        }
    }
}

/* 1 */
#u1 {.namespace > .mixin1()}
/* 2 */
#u2 {.namespace .mixin1()}
/* 3 */
#u3 {.namespace.mixin1}
/* 4 */
#u4 {.namespace .mixin1}
/* 5 */
#u5 {#namespace.mixin1.mixin1()}
/* 6 */
#u6 {#namespace.someruleset.mixin1()}

All 1-6 results seems to be equal.

I don't know if it's intended LESS behaviour, "language dark corners" or ... But here's why I would prefer to use ".namespace.mixin()" syntax and not "#namespace > .mixin()" (if I understand it correctly and if the way it currently works is an intended behaviour - assuming "less.js 1.4.x"): Strictly speaking, there's no such things as "namespace" or "mixin" in the LESS, those are no more then just "logical abstractions". There're only rulesets which can be parametric and non-parametric. Ruleset can serve as a namespace, a mixin or both depending on the way we define and invoke it.

So my original question is actually a two:

  1. Use of ">" (this is my main concern): if it's really redundand when invoking/"calling" a mixin (unlike ">" in selectors) - drop it.
  2. "#" vs. ".": If nested "mixin" can serve as namespace as well (and that's possible only if it's defined as "dot ruleset") why do we want to declare top-level namespace with "#"? In other words, if we can use ".ruleset1.ruleset2.ruleset3.ruleset4.etc()" but can't "#ruleset1 > #ruleset2 >. etc()" why use the latter syntax for a two-level only expansion? (Except the cases when we do actually need a mixin inside of an id selector).

While writing all this above, I thought it would be better to correct my original example by adding an empty parens to the ".namespace" definition to stress the fact it's an explicitly invokable entity and not a selector in any way.

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.namespace.mixin refers to an element with both classes while .namespace .mixin will find all .mixins in .namespace, or was that just a typo?

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You're right, ".namespace > .mixin", ".namespace.mixin" and ".namespace .mixin" are different beasts when they are used as selectors. But things seem to be dissimilar when it goes to mixin invoke/expansion. .. my answer is too long for a comment so I append it to my orginal question - see above ... – seven-phases-max Aug 24 '13 at 23:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Update: I've found similar topic (even with more comprehensive list of examples/tests) in the official less.js issues list: https://github.com/less/less.js/issues/1205. This seems to be like an initially unintended syntax tending to stay "as is":

surprising.. but I guess people are highly likely to rely on this and not be happy if we break it :(

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