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I'm looking for a JavaScript regular expression that will look in a sentence for a phrase, like "seem to be new" and if it finds that phase it replaces the entire sentence with "seem". So all the sentences below would be replaced by "seem"

How do I get rid of the "You seem to be new" message?
How do I get kill the "You seem to be new" message?
How do I stop the "You seem to be new" message from appearing?

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1  
Are you planning to look through a paragraph of several sentences and picking out and replacing sentences that contain this phrase? Or are sentences coming in independently? Are they each on newlines? My answer should work either way but could be made more flexible depending on the answer to these questions. –  smerny Aug 24 '13 at 4:09
    
I probably should have provided this information at first instead of after three answers have already been posted, but here's a little more. I have a help system on my page with a "What is your question?" field were people put in ordinary English. I "normalize" the raw input to key "tokens" using a string of RegEx expressions and present the topic to them that matches the most tokens. The three example sentences above are things they might ask (any one, not all) if they're sick of the newbie message. I'm looking for the best way to recognize that's what they're asking. –  Steve Aug 24 '13 at 6:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this what you are looking for?

var str = 'How do I get rid of the "You seem to be new" message? How do I get kill the "You seem to be new" message? How do I stop the "You seem to be new" message from appearing?'
str = str.replace(/[^?!.]*You seem to be new[^?!.]*[?!.]/g,"seem");
console.log(str); // "seemseemseem"

Fiddle

Also, so you can see what happens if I throw in a string that doesn't match:

var str = 'How do I get rid of the "You seem to be new" message? How do I get kill the "You seem to be new" message? This sentence doesn\'t seem to contain your phrase. How do I stop the "You seem to be new" message from appearing?'
str = str.replace(/[^?!.]*You seem to be new[^?!.]*[?!.]/g,"seem");
console.log(str); //seemseem This sentence doesn't seem to contain your phrase.seem

Fiddle

If you want to replace the sentence but keep the same punctuation:

var str = 'How do I get rid of the "You seem to be new" message? How do I get kill the "You seem to be new" message? This sentence doesn\'t seem to contain your phrase. How do I stop the "You seem to be new" message from appearing?'
str = str.replace(/[^?!.]*You seem to be new[^?!.]*([?!.])/g," seem$1");
console.log(str); // seem? seem? This sentence doesn't seem to contain your phrase. seem?

Fiddle

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An alternative to using regexp is to use indexOf

Fiddle

var str = 'How do I get rid of the "You seem to be new" message?\n\
How do I get kill the "You seem to be new" message?\n\
How do I stop the "You seem to be new" message from appearing?';

var lines          = str.split('\n')  ,
    search_string  = 'seem to be new' ,
    replace_string = 'seem'           ;

for ( var i=0,n=lines.length; i<n; i++ )
   if ( lines[i].indexOf(search_string) > -1 )
      lines[i] = replace_string ;

alert('original message: \n' + str + '\n\nnew message: \n' + lines.join('\n'));
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overkill? or actually more efficient than the string.replace method? –  Jeroen Ingelbrecht Aug 24 '13 at 4:09
    
This is also dependent on having newlines between every sentence that is a possible match. –  smerny Aug 24 '13 at 4:10
    
@JeroenIngelbrecht String.replace is most likely the optimized better solution, but indexOf is pretty efficient. I imagine it depends on the length of the string. I'd use the regex for simplicity. –  vol7ron Aug 24 '13 at 4:17
1  
@JeroenIngelbrecht Looking at some tests the performance of dynamic regex is slower than indexOf –  vol7ron Aug 24 '13 at 4:18
    
@smerny: not necessarily. You could just as easily break your lines like str.split('. ') or actually use regex there (eg str.split(/\n/)). If the sentences are in their own elements, then obviously you don't need to split at all, you just select those dom textNodes. –  vol7ron Aug 24 '13 at 4:20

You can use the String.replace function like so:

var newString = (
            'How do I get rid of the "You seem to be new" message?'
          + ' How do I get kill the "You seem to be new" message?'
          + ' How do I stop the "You seem to be new" message from appearing?'
    ).replace(/You seem to be new/g, "seem");

jsFiddle

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1  
The OP wants to the replace the entire sentence with "seem" if there is a match within that sentence. –  smerny Aug 24 '13 at 4:15
    
That's exactly what it does. I threw in a jsfiddle –  Jeroen Ingelbrecht Aug 24 '13 at 4:20
1  
All I see is the match itself getting replaced rather than the entire sentence that contains that match. –  smerny Aug 24 '13 at 4:26
    
thing is, it actually returns a new string so the original one, if it was in a var, is actually not changed –  Jeroen Ingelbrecht Aug 24 '13 at 4:30
1  
That's always the case with string operations, but the OP seems to want any sentence that contains a certain phrase to be replaced (the "entire sentence") in that newly created string. –  smerny Aug 24 '13 at 4:32

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