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This should be a common situation with variadic templates for example when tree walking children that are variadic template arguments. I find many related questions and answers but either they are about a slightly different thing or they are the same thing and I did not get it. Now to the problem. I have a non variadic tuple like this

template <class E, class T1, class T2, class T3, etc...>
struct X;

and I am overloading functions to have specialized behaviour depending on the first element of such tuple being pointer type or vector pointer type. That works fine but if I pack the template arguments into a single variadic template argument, then the overloads become ambiguous. Here is the error message:

variadic.cpp:42:17: error: ambiguous overload for ‘operator<<’ in ‘std::cout << y’
variadic.cpp:42:17: note: candidates are:...

The compiler should prefer X<vector<V*>*,T*...> over X<H*,T*...> when it tries to match vector<double*>* as first element of the tuple.

I can disambiguate using enable_if and things work again. However I would like to understand the error and if possible find other means then enable_if. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_fundamental.hpp>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

using namespace std;

template <typename ... T>
struct X;

template <>
struct X <>
{   
};  

template <typename H, typename ... T>
struct X<H*,T*...> : public X<T*...>
{
        H* value;
        X(H* value, T*... args)
                : value(value), X<T*...>(args...)
        {
        }
};

template <typename H, typename ... T>
#ifdef DO_NOT_WANNA_SEE_THE_BUG
typename boost::enable_if<boost::is_fundamental<H>, std::ostream>::type&  
       operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*,T*...> const & x)
#else
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*,T*...> const & x)
#endif
{
        return stream << "specialized scalar pointer";
}

template <typename V, typename ... T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<vector<V*>*,T*...>  const & x)
{
        return stream << "specialized vector pointer";
}

int main()
{
        double a,b;
        vector<double *> v;
        X<double*,double*> x (&a,&b);
        X<vector<double*>*, double*> y (&v, &b);
        cout << x << endl;
        cout << y << endl; // this line is ambiguous according to gcc 4.6 and later
}
share|improve this question
3  
Not that this helps at all, but Apple LLVM 4.2 (clang) chews this right up without a problem. I'm curious to know if gcc has the same issue without variadic T*... (which from what I see isn't needed), and rather you used T.... It makes no sense why it should matter, but then again, gcc is puking, and clang isn't so... see it live on ideone.com – WhozCraig Aug 24 '13 at 5:17
1  
Followup: I just noticed ideone.com uses gcc 4.8, just fyi. – WhozCraig Aug 24 '13 at 6:20
    
@WhozCraig. Perfect answer. You are right. I wanted to restrict everything to pointers but of course it is enough to do that for the Head. It is not required for the packed Tail.Your suggestion works for old gcc 4.6 also. Your remark on LLVM is also very interesting. Many Thanks! – Patrick Fromberg Aug 24 '13 at 13:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The essence is from the comment of WhozCraig:

When you drop the T* in both templates the program will compile (with warnings -Wreorder) and give the expected output.

operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*,T...> const & x)
operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<vector<V*>*, T...>  const & x)

After going through [14] Templates without any enlightenment, I think there is a compiler bug.

A modified test:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_fundamental.hpp>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

using namespace std;

#define USE_VARIADIC_TEMPLATE 1
#define USE_AMBIGUOUS 1

template <typename ... T>
struct X;

template <>
struct X <>
{
};

template <typename H, typename ... T>
struct X<H*,T*...> : public X<T*...>
{
    H* value;
    X(H* value, T*... args)
    :  X<T*...>(args...), value(value)
    {}
};

#if USE_VARIADIC_TEMPLATE
template <typename H, typename ... T>
#if USE_AMBIGUOUS
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*,T*...> const & x)
#else
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*,T...> const & x)
#endif
#else
template <typename H, typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*, T*> const & x)
#endif
{
        return stream << "specialized scalar pointer";
}

#if USE_VARIADIC_TEMPLATE
template <typename V, typename ... T>
#if USE_AMBIGUOUS
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<vector<V*>*,T*...>  const & x)
#else
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<vector<V*>*,T...>  const & x)
#endif
#else
template <typename V, typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<vector<V*>*, T*>  const & x)
#endif
{
        return stream << "specialized vector pointer";
}

int main()
{
        double a,b;
        vector<double *> v;
        X<double*,double*> x (&a,&b);
        X<vector<double*>*, double*> y (&v, &b);
        cout << x << endl;
        cout << y << endl; // this line is ambiguous according to gcc 4.6 and later
}

Even the case:

template <typename H, typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<H*, T*> const & x)
template <typename V, typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, X<vector<V*>*, T*>  const & x)

compiles nicely.

Edit: If the variadic template hold just one T passed as T* it should be the simple case shown above.

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer the modification from WhozCraig because to be consisten all T*... unpacking should be removed and not only the ones of the function overload templates. In your modified code you should also remove the last comment as it is confusing in that context. – Patrick Fromberg Aug 24 '13 at 17:40
    
...I agree now that there is a compiler error here but not a severe one because it should be a warning anyway. The right answer is as you and previously WhozCraig pointed out, that I had written something stupid and thanks to SO I am now aware. – Patrick Fromberg Aug 24 '13 at 17:53

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